Seats in the waiting area of domestic departures lounge of Calgary International Airport are seen with caution tape on them on June 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Seats in the waiting area of domestic departures lounge of Calgary International Airport are seen with caution tape on them on June 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

3-in-4 Canadians in favour of banning interprovincial travel: Poll

According to Research Co., 80 per cent of Canadians would like to see restrictions imposed

Most Canadians think the government should enforce interprovincial travel restrictions, despite legal barriers that at least one B.C. premier says makes such rules impossible.

Eighty per cent of Canadians vote in favour of a ban, according to a new online new Research Co. poll which surveyed 1,000 Canadian adults.

Premier John Horgan struck down the idea in B.C. last week, citing issues of legality.

“We can’t prevent people from travelling to British Columbia,” Horgan said in a statement.

“We can impose restrictions on people travelling for non-essential purposes if they are causing harm to the health and safety of British Columbians. Much of current interprovincial travel is work related and therefore cannot be restricted.”

RELATED: Interprovincial travel restrictions a no-go, Horgan says after reviewing legal options

The news came after the premier took part in meetings with other provincial and federal leaders.

“I asked my colleagues to carry a message back to their citizens: now is not the time for non-essential travel,” he said.

“We ask all British Columbians to stay close to home while vaccines become available. And to all Canadians outside of B.C., we look forward to your visit to our beautiful province when we can welcome you safely.”

The decision not to restrict travel hasn’t seemed to have a dampening on satisfaction with the B.C. NDP’s handling of the pandemic: 72 per cent of the adults surveyed support the province – the highest rating compared to other provinces.

Meanwhile, the poll also asked respondents if they plan to take the vaccine when it is their turn. Roughly three-in-four said they will “definitely” or “probably” be inoculated.

– with files from Ashley Wadhwani



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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