Pot calling the kettle black

In the Sentinel article of May 25, Mr. Wuori, president of Enbridge’s liquids pipeline unit, was quoted as saying, “When we read a newspaper story that gives credence and airtime to unfounded anti-business, anti- development rhetoric, let’s call the reporter, write a letter to the editor.”

Dear sir,

In the Sentinel article of May 25, Mr. Wuori, president of Enbridge’s liquids pipeline unit, was quoted as saying, “When we read a newspaper story that gives credence and airtime to unfounded anti-business, anti- development rhetoric, let’s call the reporter, write a letter to the editor.”

And also, “When we see an activist using suspect facts, dubious figures, outrageous claims and old biases to draw a crowd or attract a donation; let’s speak out and correct the inaccuracies.”

Mr. Wuori may be interested to know that Colin Kinsley, chairman of the Enbridge Gateway Alliance, was quoted in the Sentinel (April 22) in which he made several factual errors.

Kinsley pointed out there hadn’t been a spill in a Canadian regulated pipeline for more than 20 years.

Fact: according to the CBC, “In August 2000, a pipeline owned by Pembina Pipelines ruptured in BC, spilling about 6,200 barrels of light crude oil into the Pine River.”  (More recently, there were 28,000 barrels spilled in Alberta.)

In the same article, Mr. Kinsley was also quoted as saying that Canadian bitumen upgraders and conventional crude refineries supplied all of Canada’s needs so there was no domestic demand beyond that.

Fact: From StatsCan we learn that “Domestic crude accounts for only about 45 per cent of Canada’s oil consumption. Imports represented the remaining 55 per cent, mostly coming from either North Sea countries or the Middle East. Imported oil feeds refineries mostly in Eastern Canada.”

Would Mr. Wuori care to comment on the “suspect facts, dubious figures, outrageous claims” as put forth by Mr. Kinsley?

Or isn’t that what capitalists do?

 

Margaret Ouwehand.

 

 

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