Plagued by corporate rope-a-dope

I’m wearily climbing back on my tiring high horse about corporate customer service, well-known corporations which talk a great game about the quality of their customer service and customer loyalty but which, in reality, fail to deliver – and take their cue from Muhammad Ali and the “rope-a-dope” trick

I’m wearily climbing back on my tiring high horse about corporate customer service, well-known corporations which talk a great game about the quality of their customer service and customer loyalty but which, in reality, fail to deliver – and take their cue from Muhammad Ali and the “rope-a-dope” trick.

In the past month I’ve been plagued by two instances of corporate “rope-a-dope.”

I remain determined to see it through, encouraged by partial success in one instance and total frustration, over a long period in the second.

So I’ll move along and acknowledge, when pushed, communications giant Telus finally came through for me – maybe even twice. I still fail to understand why they appear to need to be dragged into making good on their digitally-recorded claims that “your business is important to us.”

Pursuing consistent high speed internet service “is important to me”. I pay for it, every first of the month – but for the couple of years I can’t claim to have been getting that from Telus. This was our second round of “rope-a-dope.”

I have to recognize two special service people, one in town and one in Edmonton, who I hope are appreciated by their employer, because their individual efforts on my behalf are all that stands between Telus’ reputation and tatters.

Being older and retired doesn’t mean I don’t have “enough” to do. But I am stubborn and sometimes I get mad enough to demand more. My guess at 14 hours on the phone alone with Telus over the past 60 days may not be dead on, but it’s not far off.

My immediate problem may have been solved by these two “beyond the call of duty” individuals (one of whom stayed at my house after working hours and did find an answer – I hope. Only time will tell. But I don’t have any more “rope-a-dope” energy to expend with Telus, which has offered me a refund on by bill for my inconvenience.

I wish I could say the same for Sears Canada. I’ve been a loyal customer for 50-plus years and Sears is well represented in my home with merchandise “they stand behind” – including a stove, fridge, dish-washer, freezer, TV, washer and dryer, lawn-mover and so on.

But ask me if I can get them to budge on recognizing that my expensive four-year-old convection kitchen stove which, even after a recall repair, still went into the same fault, putting my home and family in danger with a burner that would not turn off short of unplugging the stove.

Fortunately, on the day I was going on vacation, I noticed it and made the service call.

I also called the Terrace contractor who I know handles the Sears service contract in Kitimat.

I delayed my vacation because it was the long BC Day weekend and they could not come till the following Tuesday.

Still, as promised, the independent business people who shoulder the real burden of representing the reputation of Sears “service” did come.

They isolated the problem and fixed it, later presenting me with a very significant bill, (just under half the original value of the stove) which twigged me to why Sears appeared so all-fired evasive in dealing with my complaint.

This may have been a bigger recall issue than I know.

It took me a month to elicit the direct phone number of the corporate customer service reps, (ones up the line from those who deal with normal whining customer service requests.) I got it by e-mail on Friday last.

 

Basically, we are in dispute over when my twice-extended warranty expired, if I was adequately informed, and whether a notified safety recall problem which occurred even after a preventive service re

pair, is my problem or theirs.

My view, and I stick with it, is  it’s theirs.

The fault was a tiny $148-retail value miniature computerized mother-board, a part that can be replaced by a service man in five minutes (if he has one in hand).

It controls an on-off switch on a high heat plate and mine would not go off or move. It remained on high. That’s why I stick by my position – which exposes me to the wall of indifference that frustrates thousands of people daily throughout our country.

If my house burned to the ground  no doubt fire investigators would have pinpointed the cause. But if my family had been in the house …what then?

I’m still mad about the indifference, the delays and the recorded voice-routines so I will resume punching in the “rope-a-dope” drama with Sears service (and the muzak) today … wondering who’s the dope?

 

ahewitson@telus.net

 

 

 

Just Posted

Hirsch Creek Golf Course Volunteer, Augie Penner, talking about how he continues the tradition, set by Joe Atamchuck, to catch and release fry that keep spawning at the course. (Jacob Lubberts photo)
VIDEO: Kitimat golf course volunteers making moves for the fishlings

During the highwater season, salmon are known to lay their eggs in the ponds at the golf course

Ocean Wise’s cetacean photogrammetry research program uses aerial images collected by boat-launched drones to measure the body condition of whales. (Ocean Wise Marine Mammal License MML-18 photo)
LNG Canada commits $750K to whale research, conservation initiative

Ocean Wise education team will work alongside educational and Indigenous leaders in the area

The Sam Lindsay Aquatic Centre will be closed from June 28 until September 13 for annual facility maintenance as well as teach pool and decking repairs. (Black Press photo)
Sam Lindsay Aquatic Centre closed: June 28 – September 13

The aquatic centre will be closed for annual facility maintenance

Shoes are being left at the viewpoint on Haisla Blvd in response to the 215 bodies discovered at the Kamloops Residential School. (Jacob Lubberts photo)
Haisla Nation responds to 215 Indigenous children found buried at the site of Kamloops Indian Residential School

“Many Haisla children were sent far away, to places such as Port Alberni, and to Coqualeetza”

Susan Jay hosted a plant and garage sale on May 25 and donated all of her proceeds to the Kitimat General Hospital Foundation to help with the purchase of a new bus for residents at Mountain View Lodge, Delta King and the new Kitimat Valley Housing Society dementia home. (Barbara Campbell photo)
KGHF thanks Susan Jay for her help to purchase a new bus for seniors in multi-level care

Susan donated all proceeds to KGHF, her efforts netted the hospital foundation a total of $1,760

Hirsch Creek Golf Course Volunteer, Augie Penner, talking about how he continues the tradition, set by Joe Atamchuck, to catch and release fry that keep spawning at the course. (Jacob Lubberts photo)
VIDEO: Kitimat golf course volunteers making moves for the fishlings

During the highwater season, salmon are known to lay their eggs in the ponds at the golf course

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Chief Rosanne Casimir stands outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School after speaking to reporters, in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Kamloops chief says more unmarked graves will be found across Canada

Chief Rosanne Casimir told a virtual news conference the nation expects to release a report at the end of June

A woman wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. ranks among highest in world in COVID-19 first-dose shots: health officials

More than 76% of eligible people have received their 1st shot

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.-Alberta’s Indigenous languages, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

An artists conception of the new terminal building at the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport.
Air travel taking off in B.C., but lack of traffic controllers a sky-high concern

There will be demand for more air traffic controllers: Miller

Canadian Armed Forces experts are on their way to North Vancouver after a local homeowner expressed worry about a military artifact he recently purchased. (Twitter DNV Fire and Rescue)
Military called in to deal with antique ‘shell’ at North Vancouver home

‘The person somehow purchased a bombshell innocently believing it was an out-of-commission military artifact’

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz have set their wedding date for February, hoping that more COVID-19 restrictions will have lifted. (The Macleans)
B.C. couples ‘gambling’ on whether COVID rules will let them dance at their wedding

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz pushed back their wedding in hopes of being able to celebrate it without the constraints of COVID-19

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Report calls for airlines to refund passengers for flights halted due to COVID-19

Conclusion: federal help should be on the condition airlines immediately refund Canadian travellers

Most Read