Independent risk analysis needed on projected increase in marine traffic

Some more about the loyalty of North American politicians to their country, communities and people.

Dear sir,

Some more about the loyalty of North American politicians to their country, communities and people.

This happened about a year ago but has great relevance into the future.

The defeated Republican presidential candidate Senator John McCain (Sarah Palin’s side kick) has introduced legislation to abolish the Jones Act.

This Act was created during the Alaska/Yukon gold rush to protect Seattle merchants. As a result, only ships built, owned, crewed and operated by American citizens’ entities are allowed to operate between American ports.

It has since gained several other advantages for the Americans except for multinational corporations.

When the Exxon Valdez disaster happened it was known precisely who was to be held accountable and who was to pay for compensation and clean up (the fisheries are not back after 22 years from a relatively small oil spill).

With the Jones Act gone, flag of convenience ships can and will be used. As has been shown a number of times in the past, it is nearly impossible to find out who owns the ships in order to get compensation.

The tax payer is on the hook.

Canadian raw materials are exported in order to  have ships built, crewed, operated by foreign workers often with questionable standards.

The multinational companies make huge profits and their top executives receive disgustingly obscene remuneration which they can invest in estates in Provence, Tuscany or Lake Como, etc.

And Kitimat!?

Present traffic in and out of Kitimat is 252 ships a year with a size generally up to 40,000 DWT (dead weight tonnes).

Northern Gateway’s projection is 225 VLCC (Very Large Crude Carriers).

And LNG’s projection at this time 175,

That’s a total of 652 vessels/year.

Add to that the north south traffic crossing the route in and out of Kitimat.

Mayor Monaghan told the Financial Post (July 1) that she would like to see as many companies as possible build a “clean business that we can deal with”, adding we have 70 miles of channel that are open for business.

And being courted by the world’s energy giants as a place to do business feels  “absolutely fantastic…you can put it in big print”.

How much would the increase in traffic be?

Any increase will increase chances of an incident with a DilBit (diluted bitumen) carrying crude carrier.

Before any more projects involving marine traffic and marine access are proposed, would it not be prudent indeed necessary to do an independent risk analysis, one not sponsored and paid for by a project proponent?

Who are our elected officials working for?  The people or the big multinational corporations?

 

Dieter Wagner.

 

 

Just Posted

Kitimat arena closed until further notice due to chilling system malfunction

Saturday night’s Terrace River Kings and Kitimat Ice Demons game was cancelled as a result

Northwest Regional Airport traffic increases

LNG announcement has sparked interest

Study being conducted on proposed railyard

Facility could offload up to 60 rail cars of propane daily

UPDATE: Kitimat pool and arena evacuated due to wrong mix of chemicals

Hazmat crew sent in to determine how dangerous scene is at the Sam Lindsay Aquatic Centre

Northern First Nations partnership reshaping government’s approach to reconciliation

Kaska, Tahltan and Tlingit First Nations share Premier’s Award for Innovation with ministry

Trudeau offers to help Pacific islands face climate change impact

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with the leaders from the Pacific island nations on Saturday during the APEC Summit in Papua New Guinea

Price makes 36 saves as Habs edge Canucks 3-2

Late goal lifts Montreal past Vancouver

BC Minister of Agriculture loses stepson to accidental overdose

Lana Popham announces death of her 23-year-old stepson, Dan Sealey

Canadian military’s template for perfect recruits outdated: Vance

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff says that the military has to change because the very nature of warfare is changing, particularly when it comes to cyber-warfare

‘Toxic’ chosen as the Word of the Year by Oxford Dictionaries

Other top contenders for 2018 include ‘gaslighting’ and ‘techlash’

RCMP bust illegal B.C. cannabis lab

Marijuana may be legal but altering it using chemicals violates the Cannabis Act

Canada defeats Germany 29-10 in repechage, moves step closer to Rugby World Cup

Hong Kong needs a bonus-point win over Canada — scoring four or more tries — while denying the Canadians a bonus point

Avalanche Canada in desperate need of funding

The organization provides avalanche forecasting for an area larger than the United Kingdom

Quesnel fed up with detour, urges Ottawa to speed up road repair

West Fraser Road has been on detour since spring 2018, with no plans to repair washout until 2020

Most Read