City halls need a good decluttering

The District of Kitimat responds

By Laura Jones and Jordi Morgan

Nobody at city hall sets out to make ridiculous rules or unmanageable processes – but that’s the result when there are no checks in place to control the clutter.

Rules pile up over time like too many sweaters, DVDs, and old magazines spilling out of an overstuffed closet.

We regularly hear about red tape clutter from small businesses dealing with their local city hall.

There’s the business in Smithers, B.C., forced by the municipality to pay for building a sidewalk, connecting nothing to nowhere, in order to get a permit to renovate.

There’s Montreal’s borough of Plateau Mont-Royal which stacked up costs on business owners by banning PVC plastic chairs from outdoor patios and forced them to replace perfectly good furniture.

Then there’s the book store cafe in Winnipeg that was forced to shut down because serving a bit of mayo on sandwiches required an industrial-strength grease trap.

And there is the Vancouver dance studio suffering scheduling headaches and parental bickering over class sizes because the city can’t meet its own permitting deadlines, delaying expansions multiple times.

Some municipal governments seem so used to the piles of red tape that they don’t recognize they have a problem. Citizens are being hurt in myriad ways – from the stress red tape creates for small business to the extra costs it loads onto housing. It’s time for municipalities to follow the lead of many senior governments in Canada and do something about it.

The most important remedy is a simple one – those who keep their closets clutter-free know how it works – a one-in-one-out policy.

For every new municipal rule that comes into force, one needs to be eliminated, so that when a new government rule is needed it doesn’t just get added to the pile. One, or sometimes more, out-dated or unnecessary rules are eliminated at the same time.

Various versions of this one-in-one-out policy are proving very successful. The longest running example in North America is British Columbia’s regulatory cleanup.

Back in 2001 its provincial government set out on a major decluttering exercise, putting in place a one-in-two-out rule to achieve a one-third reduction in regulatory clutter over three years.

Once the reduction target was met, one-in-one-out became the new standard. Garbage bags of dumb rules, such as the one dictating the size of televisions allowed in restaurants, were sent to the curb and the province’s citizens are better for it.

The B.C. one-in-one-out policy was so successful at eliminating red tape while maintaining high levels of health, safety and environmental outcomes, it’s now an international model for reform.

Federally, Canada has become the first country in the world to legislate one-in-one-out for its regulations. It too has proved successful at reducing compliance costs although it does not apply as broadly as B.C.’s, so some old CDs, magazines and other junk still get a pass.

With the successes we’ve seen at the federal and provincial levels, and to mark our tenth annual Red Tape Awareness Week, we’re now challenging our cities to clean up their regulatory excesses by committing to their own one-in-one-out policy.

So, how about it city hall – are you ready to clean up your red tape?

First comes a commitment to do it, next comes putting the old Christmas sweaters and DVDs to the curb, and finally, a one-in-one-out policy to keep the closet clean.

Like the old Christmas sweaters, no one will miss your red tape.

Laura Jones is Executive VP, Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Jordi Morgan is Atlantic VP, Canadian Federation of Independent Business

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District of Kitimat Chief Administrative Officer Warren Waycheshen responds to the column:

The District of Kitimat tries to constantly review its guidelines and rules to ensure no delays or burdens to business are unnecessarily caused.

Some processes are detailed and/or have legislated timelines (such as land use items) that by their nature do take time to review and provide a decision.

Many sections of the [Kitimat] municipal code have been reviewed and updated and we will continue to review and make changes to ensure consistent and concise service delivery.

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