A quick piece for and against Enbridge Northern Gateway

Following the JRP's report in favour of Northern Gateway, here's the Sentinel's editor's pro and con piece on the pipeline.

We thought we’d go ahead and just post two opinions, one supporting the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines proposal and one not supporting the project. Enjoy the argument.

Enbridge, yay!

Just like with natural gas, Canada has abundant oil resources on the other side of the Rockies and it’s an economic loss to only allow ourselves to deal with the United States as our customers. Canada, simply, needs more capacity.

But even look at it at the ground level. The vast number of construction workers needed to build a pipeline will mean job opportunities for many.

And pipelines are arguably far safer with today’s construction and assembly standards than in years past. Simply put, it’s basically a gimme that Northern Gateway will be more reliable than other, older pipes.

Then there’s the ongoing taxes and value that the pipeline will provide to the country. The nation and province will benefit financially from the construction for sure, and that’s money that will pay for the government services and operations that we all enjoy.

Opposing the project is basically turning our noses up at $1.2 billion over the next 30 years.

And with 209 conditions to follow, it’s in writing that it’s going to have to be built right.

We need to be open to this project.

Enbridge, nay!

Now wait a minute, $1.2 billion over 30 years?

That represents only a fraction of the yearly B.C. budget, which this year alone is $44 billion.

Much good that $1.2 billion will give us over the course of 30 years.

And what about the fact that it just seems people don’t want this pipeline. Surveys and polls have shown that more people in B.C. are against the pipeline than are in favour.

Not to mention studies of Canada’s coasts and pipeline routes, showing the immense problems that could come from tanker traffic and spills.

Some don’t think Canada is even prepared for a major spill, and the pipeline and the tankers will be going through a number of ecosystems. One wrong move and we might not have a fishery.

And are jobs really as bountiful as the claims? It’ll only be a small amount of permanent jobs which are needed to run the marine terminal in Kitimat, and the same for the pipeline, once it’s done you won’t need many people to manage it in person. That leaves the control centre in Calgary as the primary place of employment regarding the pipeline itself directly.

The benefits to the province are arguably, essentially, non-existent.

Cameron Orr

Just Posted

Broken axle New Hazelton derailment could happen again: TSB

Derailment by New Hazelton caused by a broken axle can happen again without different way to inspect

Terrace resident’s bill banning single-use plastics introduced in Ottawa

MP Nathan Cullen’s presented Ben Korving’s private member’s bill Wednesday

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

Sell regulated heroin to curb B.C.’s overdose problem: report

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

B.C. Speaker Darryl Plecas resumes battle with suspended staff

Committee meets at B.C. legislature to consider new allegations

Former B.C. fire chief sues his city after termination

Keith Green’s civil claim says that he believes he was wrongfully terminated

B.C. man injured in police shooting now in wheelchair

“Shots were fired by police and the Kelowna man was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.”

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Peter Tork, Monkees’ lovable bass-guitar player, dies at 77

Tork, Micky Dolenz, David Jones and Michael Nesmith formed the made-for-television rock band

From a drunk judge to Clifford Olson: George Garrett recounts a life in B.C. news radio

New book from ‘Intrepid Reporter’ George Garrett offers readers a glimpse behind the headlines

Wife remembers B.C. man killed in possible case of mistaken identity

Rex Gill was in Kamloops working to support his family after oilfield job dried up

Millennial men least likely to have a family doctor: Statistics Canada

Report found more women have primary care physicians, compared with men

Most Read