Zoning application had Kitimat council discussing their openness to business

Councillors had split views on how fast they should move on a proposal to amend a zoning bylaw to allow for things like tattoo parlours.

A public hearing on a proposed change to the C2 Zone is set for October 21, which would add ‘Personal Service Shop’ to the list of definitions of approved use.

But the approach of council to the bylaw amendment — which came to their attention after a business owner indicated they want to open a tattoo parlour in Nechako Centre — had some split over being thorough versus the impression of feet dragging for local businesses.

That debate came after Rob Goffinet moved for only first reading of the bylaw rather than the recommended first and second.

Goffinet admitted he was acting cautious, but his reasoning was he wanted some extra time to have questions answered from staff about the change that he had no time to answer earlier, having been away at the Union of BC Municipalities conference with the majority of council.

Two readings of a bylaw must be passed before council can hold a public hearing, which allows public input before a third reading and final adoption.

Nechako Centre, which is zoned C2, does not have definitions for Personal Service Shop.

The proposed wording for the addition would be “a business where the sale of retail goods is only an accessory to the provision of services related to the care and appearance of the body or the cleaning and repair of personal affects.”

It goes on to list health clubs, gyms, tattoo and piercing studios and barber shops as examples of a personal service shop.

Personal Service Shops do exist in the C1 City Centre Zone, so is not entirely foreign to the town.

Phil Germuth worried that only passing first reading, while not necessarily meaning the process slows town, could create a bad impression.

“There’s such a minor difference between what this business is proposing and I don’t want to be seen as restricting business,” he said.

Councillors can still vote for second reading at a prior council meeting ahead of the October 21 hearing, which will take place at the start of a regular council meeting.

“I would like us to pass second reading tonight and move this along as quickly as possible. By not passing second reading I’m feeling like we’re putting out there that we may be possibly slowing this down and not expediting this as quickly as possible for such a minor change to the bylaw.”

Mario Feldhoff however did believe the amendment was substantial, but did say the proposal did make sense. That said, he was interested in hearing from the Advisory Planning Commission on the matter.

The APC, as part of council’s motion, has been referred the application for their own comment.

“I think this will work out,” he said, noting decisions won’t come any later based on the motion as presented.

The motion to pass only first reading passed.

Just Posted

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

LNG Canada sponsors fast-tracked driver’s license training in Terrace, Kitimat

The $80,000 contribution is part of the company’s commitment to hire locally

Prince Rupert Gas Transmission project searches for partners

TransCanada is renewing permits for its natural gas pipeline project to North Coast.

Coastal GasLink stops work to investigate archaeological find

OGC archaeologists are en route to the Houston-area site where Unist’ot’en report finding stone tools

All Native Basketball Tournament Day 5: Recap

Highlights and results from day 5 at the All Native Tournament

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read