Water advisory lifted Kitimat

Water advisory lifted Kitimat

Heavy rains raised turbidity levels in the Kitimat River over the weekend

The water advisory implemented by the District of Kitimat on Monday, November 18, has been lifted.

Heavy rains on Saturday and Sunday, November 16 and 17, increased turbidity levels in the Kitimat River, necessitating the issuing of the advisory, said District of Kitimat spokesperson Josh Marsh.

The Kitimat River below Hirsch Creek peaked on Sunday, November 17, at around 4:30 a.m. at just over 2.8 metres, dropping to below 2.5 metres in the evening. The level in the river started rising sharply on Saturday afternoon.

Hirsch Creek peaked at just over 1.8 metres on Sunday at around 12:30 a.m., dropping to below 1.5 metres by noon on Sunday.

Advisories

A Water Quality Advisory is one of three types of public notices commonly used by a Drinking Water Officer when there may be a noticeable change in the water quality or a manageable threat to the drinking water. The decision whether to request or order issuance of one of these notices rests with the discretion of the Drinking Water Officer, but in general, they are used under the following circumstances:

* Water Quality Advisory – Used in situations in which the public health threat posed by the water system is modest and actions can be taken to reduce the risks through means other than requiring a Boil Water Notice or Do Not Use Water Notice.

* Boil Water Notice – Used in situations in which the public health threat posed by the water supply system is significant and the nature of the threat is one that can be effectively addressed through the boiling of water.

* Do Not Use Water Notice – Used in situations where a significant public health threat exists in relation to the water supply system, and the threat cannot be adequately addressed through a Water Quality Advisory or a Boil Water Notice.

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The water level in the Kitimat River. (Image wateroffice.ec.gc.ca)

The water level in the Kitimat River. (Image wateroffice.ec.gc.ca)