Restoration Project Chief Architect Philippe Villeneuve gives Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Rector-Archpriest of the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral Patrick Chauvet a tour of the remains of the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris, Wednesday, May 15, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Trudeau offers Canadian lumber, steel to help rebuild Notre Dame Cathedral

The cathedral caught fire earlier this spring

Canada is offering softwood lumber and steel to help with the reconstruction of Paris’s famed Notre Dame Cathedral, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Wednesday after touring the iconic monument that was partially destroyed by fire in mid-April.

Not long after arriving in Paris, Trudeau visited Notre Dame alongside the cathedral’s rector, Patrick Chauvet, and French Culture Minister Franck Riester.

He said it was an honour to be able to exhibit some of the solidarity Canadians feel toward their French cousins.

“Canada will stand with France and ensure we offer all the support — whether it’s steel or wood or whatever help we can,” Trudeau said. “This is truly a piece — not just of French history — but of world history that needs to be preserved and we will be there to be part of it.”

A fire devastated the 12th-century cathedral on April 15, with the dramatic blaze playing out live on television across the globe.

VIDEO: Massive fire engulfs beloved Notre Dame Cathedral

Firefighters finally managed to gain control the blaze after several hours. The main structure and relics were preserved, but the cathedral’s roof and its famous spire were destroyed.

“This was a terrible, terrible fire, but you can’t help but marvel at how so much was saved even as we did lose so much,” Trudeau said Wednesday

The Canadian Steel Producers Association and the Forest Products Association of Canada have already indicated their support for the government initiative.

In a letter sent to French President Emmanuel Macron this week, Trudeau said Canada was proud to support France in the reconstruction.

“The success of these sectors reflects the talent and hard work of Canadians, and we will be happy to put these assets to work for France,” Trudeau wrote.

Trudeau was in Paris to take part in a series of meetings in the fight against extremism and online violence, some two months after an attack at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, left 51 dead.

He will take part in the Christchurch Call to Action summit co-hosted by Macron and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. He is also scheduled to speak at the VivaTech summit, an annual event celebrating innovation that brings together startups and industry leaders.

Trudeau also has several bilateral meetings scheduled with the leaders of Jordan and Norway on Wednesday and France and New Zealand on Thursday, when the two-day visit wraps up.

READ MORE: $1 billion raised to rebuild Paris’ Notre Dame after fire

Catherine Levesque, The Canadian Press


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