Transmission line contract inked

BC Hydro has now signed the largest contract connected to its Northwest Transmission Line.

BC Hydro has now signed the largest contract connected to its Northwest Transmission Line.

It calls for a design and build of the line which will stretch 344km from the crown corporation’s Skeena Substation south of Terrace to Bob Quinn on Hwy37 North.

The contract with Valard, a Quanta company, and Burns and McDonnell was not unexpected because the two companies topped a BC Hydro shortlist last year and had already established operations in the northwest by doing prep work.

The contract clears the way for full-on construction with an anticipated finishing date of December 2013.

“There’s been a lot of work already going on,” said BC Hydro vice-president Bruce Barrett, pointing to environmental assessments, forestry work, preliminary design and more lately, geo-technical work along the line’s route.

BC Hydro did not have Valard and Burns and McDonnell commit specifically to using northwest companies or residents for supplies, service and labour, but Barrett said the crown corporation is assured there will be regional benefits.

“There will be substantial opportunity for northwest businesses to participate,” he added.

Barrett also noted that BC Hydro has already financed what it calls “boot camps” for mainly aboriginal youth which provide the basics leading up to entering apprenticeship programs.

Barrett would not release the dollar value of the Valard and Burns and McDonnell contract.

“It’s BC Hydro’s policy not to disclose,” he said, citing confidentiality reasons.

It’s also BC Hydro policy not to disclose the dollar value of the impact benefits agreements it signs with First Nations over whose traditional territory the line will travel.

So far the crown corporation has signed agreements with the Nisga’a Nation and a number of other First Nations, including the Kitselas east of Terrace.

Barrett was also not sure if BC Hydro would release the sum total of the impact benefits agreements once it has signed all of the agreements it can with First Nations.

But he did say BC Hydro prefers people stop using the figure of $404 million when talking about the capital cost of the project.

Although that figure is used in BC Hydro’s application for an environmental certificate and is widely quoted in provincial government press releases, Barrett says the corporation uses a range of anywhere from $364 million to $525 million.

The $404 million figure does not include the dollar value of the impact benefits agreements it has been signing with the Nisga’a and with First Nations, Barrett added.

He said BC Hydro was confident the line will be built within the suggested dollar value range.

 

Just Posted

North Coast fishing grounds key to orca recovery: DFO

Plan marks waters from Langara to Rose Spit as critical habitat for northern resident killer whales

Chris Green, mother of scouts, passes away

Green, who was born near Kitimat, spent more than 60 years volunteering with Scouts Canada

Intertidal Music Festival back for round two

More than 20 performances throughout the day at the North Pacific Cannery on July 21

Alberta man missing on Kitimat River found dead

Body found on July 11 after going missing on July 7

Reported fire in Kitimat turns out to be smoking salmon

Fire reported at apartment on Albatross Street on July 10

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

VIDEO: Life’s a beach at this B.C. sand sculpting contest

More than $50,000 was up for grabs at the annual contest held in Parksville

Group urges Canada to help Holocaust denier on trial in Germany

They’re concerned about Canada’s apparent unwillingness to come to the aid of Monika Schaefer

RCMP seek person of interest after elderly man left with ‘life altering’ injuries

Burnaby RCMP believe a male teen is a ‘person of interest’ in the case

MGM sues Vegas mass shooting victims, argues it isn’t liable

The company argues it has “no liability of any kind” to survivors or families of slain victims

Vancouver police propose policy for victims, witnesses who are undocumented immigrants

If approved, officers will not ask about an immigration status, unless needed

Crashes reach ‘all-time high’ across B.C.: ICBC

Auto insurer recorded more than 350,000 crashes in 2017

Pressure on for ride hailing, bus options in B.C.

Premiers to press Ottawa for help replacing Greyhound service

Usain Bolt to make run at pro soccer in Australia

Olympic sprint great has long expressed his love of the game

Most Read