Surrey Mounties send election fraud investigation report to Crown

The BC Prosecution Service will now do charge assessment

The Surrey RCMP has sent the results of its investigation into alleged election fraud prior to the October civic election to Crown counsel.

“Allegations such as these are rare, but important to investigate to ensure the integrity of our democratic process,” said Assistant Commissioner Dwayne McDonald, in charge of the Surrey RCMP.

This follows a nearly seven-month police investigation into alleged widespread election fraud in this city leading up to the Oct. 20, 2018 civic election.

READ ALSO: Surrey’s chief election officer assures voters integrity of elections process is intact

READ ALSO: Surrey RCMP finds 67 mail ballot applications fraudulent

READ ALSO: Surrey RCMP making headway on elections fraud investigation

Three weeks before the election, the Surrey anti-gang grassroots organization Wake Up Surrey lodged a complaint with the RCMP on Sept. 28 alleging vote buying involving the city’s South Asian community, misuse of absentee ballots and a scheme to solicit registered voters to fill out mail-in voting forms with a total target of 15,000 eligible voters.

Roughly a week before the election, the RCMP said 67 of 73 applications to vote by mail that police had examined were fraudulent, investigators had interviewed two “persons of interest” and were trying to determine if criminal charges, or charges under the Local Government Act, are warranted.

Investigators at that time had not found evidence of fraud linked to any political candidate or slate.

Meantime, Surrey RCMP Sergeant Chad Greig declined to discuss any details of the report sent to the Crown.

“It’s in the hands of the prosecution service now,” he said. “As the report’s before them, we can’t speak any further about the investigation as they’re now holding the reports.

“That’s just the way it is.”

READ ALSO: Sandhu decries ‘dirty’ Surrey politics while RCMP seek alleged election fraud victims

READ ALSO OUR VIEW: Fraud answers must come quickly



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Just Posted

Gas prices spike in northern B.C. ahead of the long weekend

Fuel went up 17 cents overnight in Prince Rupert

Stellar musicians, performers recognized at 54th Pacific Northwest Music Festival

More than 150 awards, scholarships given out to Northwest B.C. participants

Cyclist braking stigma on addiction from coast to coast

Mathew Fee aims at world record for longest distance on BMX bike while sharing his story of recovery

MP Nathan Cullen to testify at oil tanker ban committee hearings

Senators travel to Prince Rupert and Terrace as part of fact-finding mission on Bill C-48

Hazelton RCMP officer pleads not guilty to assault

A trial date for Const. Eric Unrau will be set on Apr. 23

UPDATE: Four victims identified in deadly Penticton shooting spree

John Brittain, 68, faces three counts of first-degree murder and one count of second-degree murder

B.C. awaits Kenney’s ‘turn off taps,’ threat; Quebec rejects Alberta pipelines

B.C. Premier John Horgan said he spoke with Kenney Wednesday and the tone was cordial

Federal government extends deadline to make Trans Mountain decision to June 18

The National Energy Board endorsed an expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline on Feb. 22

Prince George sweeps to first-ever BC Hockey League crown

Spruce Kings beat Vernon Vipers 3-1 in the Okanagan Wednesday for 13th straight playoff win

Hwang’s first MLS goal lifts Whitecaps to 1-0 win over LAFC

Vancouver picks up first victory of season

Verdict scheduled in Giesbrecht murder trial

B.C. Supreme Court justice will render his decision May 24

Child-proof your windows ahead of warm weather: B.C. expert

Fifteen children were taken to BC Children’s Hospital for falls in 2018

B.C. trucker pleads guilty to lesser charges in fatal Manitoba crash

Gurjant Singh was fined $3,000 and given a one-year driving prohibition.

Study links preschool screen time to behavioural and attention problems

The research looked at more than 2,400 families

Most Read