Summer school pickets next: BCTF

Teacher pickets will target summer school if they don't have a settlement by June 30, BCTF's Jim Iker says

B.C. Teachers' Federation president Jim Iker speaks to reporters in Vancouver Wednesday.

Teacher pickets will target locations where summer school is being carried out if they don’t have a settlement of their strike by June 30.

B.C. Teachers’ Federation president Jim Iker announced that decision Wednesday, as he prepared for the first meeting with B.C. Public School Employers’ Association since a full-scale strike began June 17. The meeting has been characterized as “exploratory talks” dealing with possible mediation.

BCPSEA has applied to the Labour Relations Board for summer school offerings to be declared essential services, if they are “secondary remedial programs provided to students who have failed a secondary level course.”

Summer programs for elementary school students, international students or secondary students trying to improve a passing grade would not be protected by an LRB order, meaning the majority of summer programs wouldn’t go ahead.

Iker said the union is also considering the plight of B.C.’s five modified calendar schools, which have three month-long breaks instead of the traditional summer vacation.

They are in the middle of their final three-month term and are facing more disruption than other schools. BCPSEA has also applied for essential service protection so they can resume operation.

Iker said if there is no deal by June 30, BCTF negotiators would be available to continue talks, rather than taking the summer off as they did last year.

The two sides remain far apart on wages and benefits, with a long-running dispute over class size and special needs support levels going back to court this fall.

 

Just Posted

US-$473 million Kemano second tunnel project gets the go-ahead

Construction will start in spring 2018 and will be completed by 2020.

Site C dam goes ahead, cost estimate now up to $10.7 billion

Premier John Horgan says Christy Clark left him no other choice

Be a pal, become a Snow Buddy

They are overworked trying to cope with all the driveways that need clearing.

PNGI founder Chris Arnold passes away at 48

Advocate for persons with physical, mental barriers remembered for the many lives he changed

Provincial government responds to anti-dumping duties

Our goal is to make sure we evaluate measures that help the sector grow and diversify

VIDEO: Average Canadian food bill to rise by $348 in 2018

Atlantic Canada and B.C. will see the most increases for consumers

Debt-to-household-income ratio rises in third quarter

Total household credit market debt grew to $2.11 trillion in the third quarter

B.C. Mountie told to resign after texting teenage sex assault victim

RCMP documents say Const. Brian Eden sent sexually inappropriate photos to 17-year-old girl

Family doctors should learn to treat addiction, not shun patients: scientist

B.C. Centre on Substance Use’s Dr. Evan Wood said efforts underway to change addiction medicine image

Four dog deaths investigated in Cranbrook

One vet suggests a parallel to these deaths and similar ones in 2016

Meningococcal disease outbreak declared in Okanagan

Five cases in last six months among 15- to 19-year-olds, including one in Vernon

Province rejects Ajax mine in Kamloops

KGHM Ajax had proposed a 1,700-hectare open-pit copper and gold mine, just southwest of Kamloops

Border officers rally at B.C.’s Peace Arch

CBSA employees tire of ‘lack of respect’

FCC votes along party lines to end ‘net neutrality’

Move rolls back restrictions that keep big providers from blocking services they don’t like

Most Read