BC Hydro released a survey Thursday, April 22. It found that many British Columbians are unintentionally contributing to climate change with their yard maintenance choices. (Pixabay)

BC Hydro released a survey Thursday, April 22. It found that many British Columbians are unintentionally contributing to climate change with their yard maintenance choices. (Pixabay)

Spend a lot of time doing yard work? It might be contributing to climate change

Recent BC Hydro survey finds 60% of homeowners still use gas-powered lawnmowers and yard equipment

This Earth Day, BC Hydro is encouraging customers to consider going electric.

The Crown corporation released a survey Thursday (April 22) that found that many British Columbians unintentionally contribute to climate change with their yard maintenance choices.

Data accounts for 800 British Columbian households surveyed between April 16 to 18.

Despite a strong desire to reduce their carbon footprint, nearly 60 per cent of people still use gas-powered lawnmowers, leaf blowers and pressure washers – equipment that’s known to emit more greenhouse gases and pollutants.

Out of two-thirds of households polled (50 per cent which own a lawnmower) nearly 80 per cent use gas-powered models.

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“Gas lawnmowers are very inefficient,” said BC Hydro spokesperson Susie Riede.

“On average, one hour of using a gas lawnmower is the equivalent to driving a pickup truck up to 550 kilometres. Spread that out across the province over an entire season, it is about the same amount 360,000 cars would use over an entire year.”

In British Columbia, electricity provided by BC Hydro is generated from 96 per cent of clean and renewable resources.

All things considered, more than 30 per cent of British Columbians indicated that they would still opt to use gas-powered tools.

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sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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