Resident unhappy with city’s snow job

While he recognises the city has to face economic realities, a local resident says sacrificing safety is not the way to go.

While he recognises the city has to face economic realities, a local resident says sacrificing safety is not the way to go.

In a letter to council Doug Thomson said this year’s change to the snow clearing policy was making it “downright dangerous” for residents.

“Not only are side streets difficult to drive, but, as many also function as sidewalks, they have become very treacherous for pedestrians,” he pointed out.

“I have seen children walking to school while vehicles struggle past them, the drivers trying to avoid both the children and getting stuck.”

Thomson warned that anytime vehicles, people and treacherous conditions were mixed, “we’re asking for a tragedy.”

He also had complaints about the quality of snowclearing this year which he described as “uncharacteristically bad”.

For example, there had been repeated incidents where a small snowblower had cleared a sidewalk only for a snow plough to come by and fill the sidewalk in again.

He also had concerns about the speed those ploughs travelled city streets.

“I certainly don’t know how they could ever stop in an emergency situation,” he said, adding he had seen one slide halfway through the first Haisla Boulevard traffic lights (coming down the hill) with the blade down and the brakes locked.

As for sidewalks, they were rarely being ploughed and sanded, making walking treacherous.

Noting he had fallen three times trying to negotiate sidewalks despite the fact “I am careful, wear very good boots and have very good balance,” Thomson added, “Creating a situation where people, especially seniors, are faced with the option of dangerous walks or being shut-in is hardly a good, healthy community strategy.”

He closed by hoping “council will see fit to revisit this asinine policy before someone is seriously injured or killed”.

Council referred the matter to its next Committee of the Whole meeting.

Just Posted

Broken axle New Hazelton derailment could happen again: TSB

Derailment by New Hazelton caused by a broken axle can happen again without different way to inspect

Terrace resident’s bill banning single-use plastics introduced in Ottawa

MP Nathan Cullen’s presented Ben Korving’s private member’s bill Wednesday

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

Sell regulated heroin to curb B.C.’s overdose problem: report

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

BC SPCA investigates Okanagan woman with prior animal abuse convictions

BC SPCA is investigating a property near Vernon

Man wanted for sex trafficking, confinement may be heading to B.C.

Kevin Myrthil, 26, is also accused of assault on a 19-year-old woman at an Edmonton hotel

B.C. Speaker Darryl Plecas resumes battle with suspended staff

Committee meets at B.C. legislature to consider new allegations

Former B.C. fire chief sues his city after termination

Keith Green’s civil claim says that he believes he was wrongfully terminated

B.C. man injured in police shooting now in wheelchair

“Shots were fired by police and the Kelowna man was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.”

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Peter Tork, Monkees’ lovable bass-guitar player, dies at 77

Tork, Micky Dolenz, David Jones and Michael Nesmith formed the made-for-television rock band

From a drunk judge to Clifford Olson: George Garrett recounts a life in B.C. news radio

New book from ‘Intrepid Reporter’ George Garrett offers readers a glimpse behind the headlines

Most Read