Public input wanted on salmon management

Engagement sessions part of strategy put forth by new Wild Salmon Advisory Council

The province’s Wild Salmon Advisory Council still hasn’t published a list of dates and venues for community engagement sessions due to start in December.

The engagement sessions are necessary in order for the council to receive feedback from stakeholders on recommendations they’ve put forward to the government on better managing wild salmon stocks.

At the time of going to press, the director of the Wild Salmon Secretariat hadn’t replied to questions about the live consultations.

READ MORE: North coast represented on B.C.’s new Wild Salmon Advisory Council

The council presented its options paper to government earlier this fall, containing 14 specific recommendations to support the sustainability of the wild salmon industry in B.C.

The recommendations consist of three main goals: increase wild salmon abundance; support and encourage greater community engagement; and enhance the economic, social and cultural benefits that accrue to B.C. communities from wild salmon and other seafood resources.

The options paper notes investment in scientific study and data quality has been significantly reduced over several years, contributing to a lack of confidence when reporting the status of salmon and fisheries management decisions.

For areas like the Northwest, it reads, it’s particularly harmful to recreational fishery economies.

“A greater degree of certainty and stability is important. For business planning purposes, secondary service providers require the ability to market their products during winter months,” states the options paper.

“Suppliers require notice in order to create and manage inventory. Each group shares a common interest to understand what the level of certainty is for expectation and opportunity. Salmon management decisions that are made with minimal notice can result in erosion of trust and loss of market share for secondary service providers.”

The province had planned to refer the report to the Select Standing Committee on Agriculture, Fish and Food to conduct a public engagement on the options paper but, in a press release, said due to scheduling challenges and time constraints it was decided the council would instead lead public engagement.

The Wild Salmon Advisory Council consists of 14 British Columbians with a broad understanding of the role that salmon play within B.C.’s environment, for coastal and inland Indigenous communities, and local economies up and down the coast.

The council is co-chaired by Chief Marilyn Slett of Heiltsuk Nation and Doug Routley, MLA for Nanaimo-North Cowichan. Adam Olsen, MLA for Saanich North and the Islands, is also a council member.

While the dates for public engagement aren’t known, the online public engagement portal is now open for feedback.

To access the public engagement site, or read the options paper visit: www.engage.gov.bc.ca/bcwildsalmonstrategy/


 


quinn@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Shames Mountain creates new fund for youth in memory of late founder

The ‘Billey Season Youth Pass’ will be given out annually

Coastal GasLink gets interim injunction against Unist’ot’en

The LNG pipeline company can start work Monday with enforcement approved by court.

Terrace users on Facebook post warnings about vehicle break-ins

RCMP say it’s important to always lock your doors

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

Tyler Dozzi breaks national record, ‘running like a madman’

Terrace runner sets new time in Boston in his last U20 race

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Rash of bomb threats a learning opportunity for response capacity, Goodale

Thursday’s wave of bomb threats swept across communities on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border

Mike Duffy can’t sue Senate over suspension without pay, judge rules

Duffy’s lawsuit sought more than $7.8 million from the upper chamber

Most Read