Eagle biologist David Hancock inspects a tree, which was once home to an eagle nest, in South Surrey. (Aaron Hinks photo)

Prominent B.C. eagle nesting tree cut down

City investigating after tree, near Highway 99, was illegally damaged

The city is investigating after it had to remove a tree that was home to one of the “most noticeable eagle’s nests in Surrey.”

Surrey’s manager of trees Nadia Chan told Peace Arch News that she received a call Tuesday afternoon that a tree, located on private property at the corner of Croydon Drive and 20 Avenue, had been partially cut and was at risk of falling.

A city arbourist visited the site that afternoon and determined that the tree was at high risk of falling because it had been cut on both sides, and “almost entirely the way through,” Chan said.

Surrey eagle biologist David Hancock, owner of Hancock Wildlife Foundation, was there to supervise the removal of the tree Tuesday evening.

“I had no alternative (but) to say that it had to come down,” Hancock told PAN, adding that the tree was hanging on by two inches of wood.

Hancock said he’s known of the eagle nest, which could be easily spotted from Highway 99, for the past eight years. It has been used to raise bald eagles every year since then, he added.

Chan said the city’s first priority was to secure the area. Crews began closing the road, and removing the tree at approximately 5:30 p.m.

Chan said an investigation has been opened by both the city and province, and they are yet to have any leads on who may be responsible for damaging the tree. She said the city notified the province because the damage caused to the tree is an infraction of the Wildlife Act.

“So many people drive by and see it so easily. The tree and the area around it was slated to be saved. The fact that (someone) just said ‘the hell with it, I’m just going to pay the fine and cut it down’… that’s sheer greed,” Hancock said.

Hancock said there were no eagles in the tree when it was cut down, but he did see an eagle nesting in the tree on Sunday (July 22).

“The nest is an active nest. It’s raised young every year.”

While the tree was being removed, Hancock said a group of neighbours gathered to see what was going on.

“It was not pleasant, but everybody behaved themselves.”

Chan said the city did not issue any permits for the removal of the tree.

“The person who started the removal complicated matters. It was a dangerous removal. The company that we had on site did an amazing job at bringing that tree down safely,” Chan said.

Hancock said the person who initially cut the tree wedged out a section and then cut through the other side.

“All of a sudden, it wasn’t going to go in the direction he wanted so he abandoned the area and got the hell out of there,” Hancock said. “It was about to fall on the power lines.”

Chan agreed that the power lines were a concern.

“Now Surrey doesn’t have its showpiece bald-eagles nest. One of the most productive. It’s kind of sad,” Hancock said.

Wednesday afternoon, Surrey resident Brian Thorsteen was walking near the fallen tree. A pile of twigs and feathers, which used to be an approximate five-foot-by-five-foot eagles nest, was scattered across the ground.

Thorsteen said he didn’t want to take a closer look because “it makes me feel sick.”

He told PAN he was in the area at approximately 5 a.m. Wednesday morning, and could hear juvenile eagles crying from a nearby tree.

Hancock said he’s interested in rallying the community together to build a new eagle nest in the area.

Just Posted

Terrace death not considered suspicious at this time: RCMP

Body of 49-year-old man was found in wooded area near Olson Ave. March 22

Northwest mobile unit to help those at heart of mental health, addiction crisis

Province, Northern Health unveils new unit in Terrace to bridge gaps in services

Move natural gas pipeline, MP suggests

Coastal GasLink could then avoid opposition

Coastal GasLink violates terms of permit

Tree clearing took place outside Kitimat

Edmonton judge rules Omar Khadr’s sentence has expired

Eight-year sentence imposed in 2010 would have ended last October had Khadr remained in custody

Trudeau sells housing plan in visit to hot real estate market in B.C.

Trudeau said the budget contains measures to help first-time buyers

Norway opens probe into why cruise ship ventured into storm

The Viking Sky was headed for southern Norway when it had engine problems on Saturday afternoon

B.C. river cleanup crew finds bag of discarded sex toys

Chilliwack volunteers stumble on unexpected find while removing 600 lbs of trash from riverway

Fired B.C. farmland commission chair backs NDP rule changes

Richard Bullock agrees with Lana Popham, ALC records don’t

Michael Dunahee’s disappearance remains the largest probe in Victoria police history

The four-year old Victoria boy went missing without a trace on March 24, 1991

Kamloops chamber of commerce director let go after controversial Facebook posts

Facebook account had derogatory comments about Muslims, Justin Trudeau

B.C. RCMP officer cleared after Taser incident seriously injures woman

Woman with knives refused to comply with orders therefore officer used appropriate level of force

‘Bikinishe’ swimwear retailer prompts Better Business Bureau warning

Watchdog has gotten dozens of complaints about company, which has been using fake Vancouver address

Most Read