In this Nov. 6, 2017 photo, Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves the federal courthouse in Washington. Manafort has sued special counsel Robert Mueller saying he exceeded authority in the Russia probe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Former Trump aide Paul Manafort found guilty of eight charges

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him

Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for U.S. President Donald Trump, has been found guilty of eight charges in his financial fraud trial.

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him.

READ MORE: Judge sends Trump’s ex-campaign chair Paul Manafort to jail

READ MORE: What does Mueller have? Manafort trial offers glimpse

READ MORE: Cross-examination focuses on Manafort protege’s own crimes

More to come.

The Latest on the Paul Manafort trial:

4:40 p.m.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has been found guilty of eight financial crime charges in the first trial victory for special counsel Robert Mueller’s team.

A judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts after jurors failed to reach a unanimous verdict.

The jury deliberated for four days before announcing the verdict at the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Virginia.

Prosecutors spent more than two weeks presenting their case as they sought to prove Manafort concealed millions of dollars in offshore accounts from the IRS.

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4:25 p.m.

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort says it’s reached a verdict on eight counts but is undecided on the remaining 10.

Jurors made that announcement in a note Tuesday afternoon to the federal jury overseeing the trial.

The jury is in its fourth day of deliberations and had signalled earlier in the day that it was stuck on at least one count.

U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III encouraged jurors to continue deliberations, and suggested he was not ready to consider a partial verdict.

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4:15 p.m.

The jury in the Paul Manafort financial fraud trial has submitted a new note to the judge.

That’s according to the office of special counsel Robert Mueller, whose office is prosecuting the former Trump campaign chairman.

The jury earlier Tuesday suggested it was stuck on at least one of the 18 counts against Manafort. Jurors asked what they should do if they could not agree on one of the counts in the indictment.

U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III encouraged the panel to continue deliberating.

This is the fourth day of deliberations for the federal jury in Alexandria, Virginia.

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11:45 a.m.

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort wants to know what to do if it cannot reach a consensus for a single count in the case.

Jurors posed the question to U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III on their fourth day of deliberations. They also said they would need a new verdict form.

Prosecutors say Manafort hid tens of millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine. They also say he lied on loan applications to obtain millions more to maintain a lavish lifestyle.

Manafort’s attorneys called no witnesses, arguing prosecutors failed to meet their burden of proof.

The trial is the first courtroom test of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, though the case doesn’t involve allegations of Russian election interference.

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9:50 a.m.

The jury in the fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has begun its fourth day of deliberations.

Judge T.S. Ellis III sent the jury back to resume deliberating Tuesday shortly after 9:30 a.m.

Jurors deliberated past 6 p.m. Monday without submitting notes or questions.

The trial of Manafort is now in its fourth week. Prosecutors say Manafort hid tens of millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine. They also say he lied on loan applications to obtain millions more to maintain a lavish lifestyle.

Manafort’s attorneys called no witnesses in his defence, arguing the prosecution failed to meet its burden of proof.

The trial is the first courtroom test of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, though the case doesn’t involve allegations of Russian election interference.

The Associated Press


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