New power line needed for LNG project

New power line needed for LNG project

Would connect Site C to LNG plant at Kitimat

BC Hydro is dusting off plans first proposed years ago to build a power line to Kitimat to service Kitimat LNG should a positive Final Investment Decision be announced.

Kitimat LNG wants to use electricity from BC Hydro instead of natural gas to power its equipment to compress and super-cool natural gas for export overseas.

In using electricity instead of natural gas, Kitimat LNG — a partnership of Chevron and Australian-based Woodside Energy International — is being billed as a way to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

But Kitimat LNG would first need BC Hydro to build a transmission line to Kitimat – the current 287kv line which runs along the east side of the Kitimat River valley can only provide for BC Hydro’s existing requirements and the LNG Canada plant now under construction.

READ MORE: LNG Canada cost to exceed stated $40 billion price tag

“The proposed [Kitimat] LNG project would require additional capacity beyond that which is currently available in the region,” said BC Hydro official Kevin Aquino last week.

“As such, we’re currently assessing what the potential impact would be in terms of capacity and transmission.”

Aquino stopped short of indicating whether the amount of power needed by Kitimat LNG would come from BC Hydro’s massive Site C project now under construction in northeastern B.C.

“It’s important to note that our electricity system is integrated and does not pinpoint a single generation resource, such as a dam, to a single customer, like an LNG project.”

The electricity required to power the operations of Kitimat LNG would be supplied through our own integrated system,” said Aquino.

Details about how much power Kitimat LNG would need wasn’t provided.

“Customer load information is confidential and commercially sensitive,” Aquino said.

Renewed interest in the Kitimat LNG project surfaced earlier this month when joint venture partners Chevron Canada and Woodside submitted an application to the National Energy Board (NEB) to double the original export goals and extend the export licence from 20 years to 40 years, following a redesign of the original project first developed in the early part of the decade.

The redesign calls for the production of 18 million metric tonnes of liquefied natural gas a year from three “trains” or processing lines.

Natural gas would be pumped from northeastern B.C. through the already-approved but not-yet-started Pacific Trail Pipeline to the Kitimat LNG site at Bish Cove just outside of Kitimat.

There’s no indication of when Kitimat LNG might announce that it is proceeding with its project.

B.C. Hydro’s preparations to provide power to LNG plants at Kitimat were first revealed in 2012 via a document examining long-range requirements around the province.

The crown corporation listed Kitimat LNG, LNG Canada (which is already under construction) and a project since abandoned called BC LNG as potential customers.

READ MORE: Chevron seeks NEB licence that could nearly double production at Kitimat LNG

Then, as now, BC Hydro indicated the one existing 287kv line it has from the Skeena Substation just south of Terrace to the Minette Substation near Kitimat was incapable of handling all potential requirements.

The Skeena Substation is a regional distribution point for power coming into the area via a 500kv line from the Williston Substation near Prince George. A variety of other lines then branch out from the substation to communities around the region.

“One option for meeting these future needs is a new 500kv line linking Williston Substation to Minette Substation for an approximate length of 500 km,” explained the 2012 BC Hydro document in commenting on how it could serve LNG customers.

The Williston Substation is a key BC Hydro facility, serving as a connecting point for power coming from BC Hydro’s existing facilities in the northeast and from Site C when it’s completed.

Chevron Canada communications team lead Leif Sollid said that Kitimat LNG is in discussions with BC Hydro but could not disclose any information on power requirements for the plant at this time.

kitimatLNGlng canada

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Cara Webb photo)
Cara Webb’s dog, Millie, who bolted during New Year’s Eve fireworks and was missing for almost a week. She was eventually found by Webb’s neighbour.
Good News, Kitimat!

Bringing some local good news to your week

Kitimat’s Gordon Wilson, who recently won $150,000 on a scratch & win ticket he bought at City Centre Mall. (BCLC photo)
Kitimat man wins $150,000 on scratch & win ticket

Gordon Wilson bought the ticket at City Centre Mall

People skate on a lake in a city park in Montreal, Sunday, January 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
The end of hugs: How COVID-19 has changed daily life a year after Canada’s 1st case

Today marks the one year anniversary of COVID-19 landing in Canada

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

The 670-km Coastal GasLink pipeline was approved by B.C. and 20 elected First Nations councils on its path

Crews with Discovery Channel film as an Aggressive Towing driver moves a Grumman S2F Tracker aircraft around a 90-degree turn from its compound and onto the road on Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021. It was the “most difficult” part of the move for the airplane, one organizer said. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: Vintage military plane gets towed from Chilliwack to Greater Victoria

Grumman CP-121 Tracker’s eventual home the British Columbia Aviation Museum on Vancouver Island

Rolling seven-day average of cases by B.C. health authority to Jan. 21. Fraser Health in purple, Vancouver Coastal red, Interior Health orange, Northern Health green and Vancouver Island blue. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
2nd COVID vaccine doses on hold as B.C. delivery delayed again

New COVID-19 cases slowing in Fraser Health region

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talk about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. Two more cases of the COVID-19 strain first identified in South Africa have been diagnosed in British Columbia, bringing the total to three as of Jan. 16.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. now has three cases of South African COVID-19 variant, six of U.K. strain

Both variants are thought to spread faster than earlier strains

Rodney and Ekaterina Baker in an undated photo from social media. The couple has been ticketed and charged under the Yukon’s <em>Civil Emergency Measures Act</em> for breaking isolation requirements in order to sneak into a vaccine clinic and receive Moderna vaccine doses in Beaver Creek. (Facebook/Submitted)
Great Canadian Gaming CEO resigns after being accused of sneaking into Yukon for vaccine

Rod Baker and Ekaterina Baker were charged with two CEMA violations each

Police discovered a makeshift nightclub in a Vancouver apartment on Jan. 23, 2021, and say it wasn’t the first time this month officers have been called to the unit over social gathering concerns. (Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
Doorman of makeshift ‘booze-can’ in Vancouver apartment fined; police look to court order

This marks the fourth complaint about social gatherings inside the apartment in January

A Kelowna couple welcomed their Nooner baby in December. (Flytographer)
Kelowna couple welcomes baby girl from Hotel Zed Nooner campaign

Nicole and Alex will now have 18 years of free stays at the hotel

Kyrell Sopotyk was drafted by the Kamloops Blazers in 2016 and played two seasons with the Western Hockey League club. (Photograph By ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW)
Kamloops Blazer paralyzed in snowboarding accident sparks fundraiser for family

As of Jan. 24, more than $68,000 had been raised to help Kamloops Blazers’ forward Kyrell Sopotyk

(Pixhere photo)
B.C. dentists argue for COVID-19 vaccine priority after ‘disappointing’ exclusion from plan

Vaccines are essential for dentists as patients cannot wear masks during treatment, argues BCDA

The fine for changing lanes or merging over a solid line costs drivers $109 and two penalty points in B.C. (Screenshot via Google Street View)
B.C. drivers caught crossing, merging over solid white lines face hefty fine

Ticket for $109, two penalty points issued under Motor Vehicle Act for crossing solid lines

Most Read