NDP housing critic David Eby

NDP calls B.C. housing plan a step back

Housing Minister Rich Coleman returns to direct social housing investment; NDP's David Eby says some rents will go up

The B.C. government is committing to put an additional $335 million into social housing projects over the next five years, most of it from transfers of property to non-profit societies.

Premier Christy Clark announced the social housing program before this week’s provincial budget, calling it “the largest single social and affordable housing investment in the province’s history.”

That description was targeted by the opposition, who said it represents a reduction in the commitment made in the government’s 2015 plan. NDP housing critic David Eby said Monday the announcement by Clark and Housing Minister Rich Coleman came after the government was caught redirecting proceeds of social housing sales to general revenue.

“Under this program, the province sells public assets, social housing across the province, to non-profit organizations,” Eby told the legislature. “Unfortunately, when they sell this social housing, they do not and they cannot, because of the economics, guarantee that all of the units will continue to be rented at non-market rates. That’s rents affordable by seniors, to people with disabilities, to families living in poverty.

“A significant number of these units will be rented at what he called market rates, which is a fancy way of saying rates that are not affordable to the people who used to live in those units.”

The B.C. Liberal government’s plan to invest directly in new social housing is a change from Coleman’s past policy to focus on rent subsidies rather than direct spending on social housing. The province currently pays rent assistance to nearly 30,000 low-income seniors and families, and funds another 41,000 in independent social housing.

The latest commitment is to expand social housing with $50 million in the fiscal year that starts April 1, another $50 million the following year, $75 million in 2018-19 and $90 million each of the next two years.

Coleman said the money comes from the province’s non-profit asset transfer program, begun in 2014.

“Its success is allowing us to reinvest money back into affordable housing across the province, while also helping non-profit societies secure the financing they need to be sustainable,” Coleman said.

The B.C. government defines “affordable housing” as costing 30 per cent or less of the household’s gross income.

 

Just Posted

Second World War prompts airport construction

And now it’s the busiest airport in the region

Trudeau announces bioregional oceans protection agreement in Prince Rupert

Agreement announced in partnership with 14 central and north coast First Nations

115 new wildfires burning across B.C. due to 19,000 lightning strikes

More fires expected to start today, says BC Wildfire Service officials

B.C. turns up the heat

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for most the province due to high temperatures

‘Daddy bonus’ common in B.C. workplaces, study finds

UBC researchers say dads don’t have to be number one in the office to get a raise

B.C. BMX kid wows GoPro with homemade video

Eight-year-old Rex Johnson wins award for inventive video

Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna suspended for 75 games

23-year-old pitcher faces assault charge

Vancouver Canucks tab Quinn Hughes with No. 7 overall pick in NHL draft

University of Michigan standout was second defenceman picked in first round

Gun, drugs and cash seized in arrest of alleged B.C. fentanyl dealer

Vancouver Island man Brent Connors is facing nine charges in relation to investigation

Jogger spent two weeks in U.S. detention centre after accidentally crossing B.C. border

Cedella Roman, 19, crossed the border while out for a run

PHOTOS: Police rescue baby seal found on rocky B.C. shoreline

Marina Mammal Rescue Centre recommends residents observe from a distance

B.C. woman with severely disabled son keeps getting parking tickets

‘There has to be something they could do’

‘Creep off’ reporting system aims to track street harassment in Metro Vancouver

Text-based hotline launches to collect public reports on where and when harassment occurs

10 feet from home: B.C. grassfire offers stark reminder how quickly blazes burn

Kamloops woman among first people in B.C. to be told to evacuate home this wildfire season

Most Read