Spectra Energy gas processing plant in northeastern B.C., where sulphur and other impurities are removed from natural gas extracted mostly from shale deposits using hydraulic fracturing. (Black Press files)

Spectra Energy gas processing plant in northeastern B.C., where sulphur and other impurities are removed from natural gas extracted mostly from shale deposits using hydraulic fracturing. (Black Press files)

LNG Canada lauded as environmental saviour

Pipeline, terminal, tankers will have significant impact

B.C. Premier John Horgan and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have joined global energy players in describing Canada’s first liquefied natural gas development as a path to low-carbon energy.

The $40 billion LNG Canada project, announced in Vancouver by a global consortium led by Shell, is the way to “save Mother Earth,” said Kitimat Mayor Philip Germuth. But the environmental debate will carry on for some time, as dredging begins in the remote harbour and work begins on a pipeline across the Rocky Mountains to fill high-pressure tankers that will sail out Douglas Channel to Asia.

“There will come a day when traditional energy sources will give way to new energy sources, just as coal gives way to LNG,” Trudeau said.

Shell estimates that coal is still 30 per cent of the world energy source, while natural gas provides the equivalent energy with half the carbon dioxide emissions and only one tenth of the air pollution of coal.

RELATED: Greens opposed to LNG development

LNG Canada CEO Andy Calitz referred to the environmental battle over oil pipelines in B.C., drawing laughter as he noted that the gas project “shows the Prime Minister that it can be done in Premier Horgan’s province.”

As B.C. Greens leader Andrew Weaver confirmed he will vote against tax breaks for the project negotiated by the NDP government, B.C. Liberals are expected to support a project their government worked on for years. Horgan’s government intends to repeal an LNG income tax that was imposed on the Petronas-led Pacific Northwest LNG project that was cancelled amid a slump in LNG.

The project will “help China and India wean themselves off coal,” Peace River North MLA Dan Davies told the legislature Tuesday.

Horgan has adopted the same environmental argument, after opposing it when former premier Christy Clark pushed it aggressively through her six years in office.

Horgan and B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman have promised to release a greenhouse gas plan this fall that will take into account the emissions from LNG development and develop reductions in transportation and other sources of carbon emissions in the province.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureLNG

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross has been named critic for Environment and Climate Change Strategy for the BC Liberals. (Black Press file photo)
Skeena MLA Ellis Ross named critic for Environment and Climate Change Strategy

Previously, Ross was the critic for LNG, Resource Opportunities, and Responsible Development

Red sky in morning: an early-morning sunrise on May 16, 2020, captured just north of Kitimat. (Eric Roy photo)
Clare’s Corner: Hello, darkness, my old friend

Why does the after-work darkness affect you so much more as an adult than as a child?

(Corrado Colombo photo)
Corrado Colombo, with his wife, Lucy. Colombo is from Italy, but met Kitimat born-and-raised Lucy on one of his annual fishing trips to Kitimat in the early 2000s.
In Our Valley: Corrado Colombo

Corrado Colombo never expected that an annual fishing trip to Kitimat would change his life

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Fatty Legs co-author responds to Abbotsford class assignment on residential schools

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
B.C. man defends his family against intruder, saves neighbour while wielding hockey stick

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

Harbour seals rest on log booms at Flavelle Mill in Port Hardy. With recent announcements the mill will be getting rid of the log booms, Dr. David Rosen sees an opportunity to study how the disappearance of this highly-frequented refuge for the seals will alter their behaviour in Burrard Inlet. (Photo supplied by David Rosen)
What the heck is going on with marine mamals in Vancouver waterways?

UBC researcher asks why they’re returning, and what role we’re playing

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009. (RCMP photo)
Human remains found off U.S. coast in 2009 identified as Penticton man

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009

Most Read