Kitimat turns down MMBC recycling offer

he District of Kitimat has declined the offer from Multi-Material BC.

The District of Kitimat has declined the offer from Multi-Material BC to be given a financial incentive to pick up printed paper and packaging material as part of a province-wide recycling plan.

Councillors had until this month to decide whether to accept the program, which would have meant curbside collection of the recyclable, however a lot of questions and unclear costs meant they may have been walking into a lot of financial burdens.

“We want to be doing the recycling, I think it’s very important, but under the proposed plan from Multi Material BC, it’s just not worth it,” said councillor Corinne Scott.

Multi Material BC is a non-profit group which was formed to implement these recycling changes.It’s part of a province-wide program that shifts the cost of recycling from taxpayers, to the consumers and producers.

Communities which already provide curbside garbage collection were offered the opportunity to take part in the program, which goes into action May 19, 2014.

For the District it would mean $137,000 to collect the recycling, but the estimate on expenses came out between $195,000 and $200,000.

Plus there were a number of requirements that, if not met, would result in hefty fines.

Although councillor Mario Feldhoff repeated a conclusion from the City of Prince George that there may have been $2 million in potential fines if certain rules were not followed, MMBC managing director Allen Langdon clarified that MMBC would cap fines at $120,000 and 24 loads.

Langdon said there are three main categories for penalties including contamination, labour disruption, and late reporting of services.

“It’s important to producers because they are the ones who are funding this program,” Langdon added.

“What they say is that ‘we understand we are responsible for our material, but we don’t want to have to pay for a bunch of stuff that isn’t printed paper or packaging.’”

Langdon also wants to assure member service providers—the municipalities and private companies who will have to work together to see recycled material through the processing chain—that penalties won’t be given out will-nilly.

“There’s a pretty extensive process in A) determining if there is a problem, B) verifying if in fact it is a problem, and C) working with the collector in question, if it’s a local government, in developing a remediation plan to address the issues. If the plan works then I don’t think we have an issue,” he said.

District of Kitimat staff noted that MMBC, under the terms of the offered contract, could cancel the arrangement with 180 days notice without cause.

So Kitimat administration was concerned that if they invested the capital, which would include a $250,000 collection truck, there was no assurance the contract would continue long-term.

In their motion councillors did suggest to MMBC that they develop a recycling depot in Kitimat to collect the products. (KUTE does not have the capacity to handle the volume of household material that would be collected, in addition to the commercial waste they already collect.)

Mario Feldhoff said that staff should come back in the future with a report that fleshes out the concept of a local recycling depot that they could possibly send to MMBC as a counter-proposal.

Langdon has told the Sentinel that once the contracts were sorted out for collection the organization would look into receiving proposals for the post-collection side of the process.

Just Posted

Airport registers modest passenger increase

Manager anticipates further growth in 2018 as expansion project nears completion

Nearly $500,000 available for internships with First Nations government

Funds announced through partnership with Northern Development and Government of Canada

Kitimat registers biggest drop in property assessments

The residential property in the north with the highest value was $2.892 million

Former mayor Ray Brady passes away

“What I can say is that he was passionate about his beliefs and he would fight for them.”

CDC’s housing section looking for new home

CDC executive director says it has until Jan. 31 to move out.

Airport registers modest passenger increase

Manager anticipates further growth in 2018 as expansion project nears completion

Las Vegas shooter acted alone, exact motive still undetermined: Sheriff

Stephen Paddock was behind the gunfire that killed 58 people including to Canadians

Botox, bomb shelters, and the blues: one year into Trump presidency

A look into life in Washington since Trump’s inauguration

Christopher Garnier appealing murder conviction in death of off-duty cop

Jury found Garnier guilty in December, rejecting his claim she died accidentally during rough sex

Transportation watchdog must revisit air passenger obesity complaint

Canadian Transportation Agency must take new look at Gabor Lukacs’ complaint against Delta Air Lines

Gas plants verdict coming down today; ex-premier’s top aides to learn fate

Verdict to be delivered on senior staff to former Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty

WestJet appeals lost bid to scrap harassment lawsuit

Airline argues judge was wrong to have dismissed the company’s application to strike the legal action

Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here’s how

Secretary of homeland security explains a new policy that let’s border guards check phones

‘Beautiful writer’ Nancy Richler dies of cancer in Vancouver hospital

Montreal-born author spent most of her adult life in B.C. as a fiction writer and novelist

Most Read