Chilliwack RCMP use a metal detector to look for evidence on Woodbine Street after a shooting in August 2018. The victim, Stanny Carr, died in hospital seven months later March 6, 2019. (Greg Knill/ Black Press file)

Is it a homicide? B.C. woman dies in hospital, seven months after being shot

Stepfather think Chilliwack case should now be a homicide, but IHIT has not confirmed anything

Seven months after a violent shooting on in downtown Chilliwack, the female victim has died. But it is still unclear if the incident is now considered a homicide, something the woman’s stepfather doesn’t understand.

Stanny Bernice Carr was shot in a vehicle in the 9400-block of Woodbine Street just after 3 a.m. on Aug. 8, 2018.

READ MORE: One injured in shooting on Woodbine Street in Chilliwack

Neighbours were rattled after hearing gunshots in the middle of the night, with one witness reporting on social media he went out to find Jeep with both passenger and driver’s side windows blown out.

Carr was there bleeding, suffering from a serious gunshot wound.

Stanny Bernice Carr was shot on Woodbine Avenue in Chilliwack in August 2018. She died on March 6, 2019.

Her stepfather, Colin Collins, told Black Press Media a bullet went into the 43-year-old’s spine and remained there.

“It caused her to be paralyzed from the shoulders down,” Collins said. “We thought she was going to die.”

She spent time in hospital in Vancouver and then Surrey, where she died March 6.

The RCMP’s Integrated Homicide Investigation Team was asked multiple times if it is now in charge of the file, but a spokesperson has not returned emails or phone calls to confirm.

If IHIT is not involved, Collins doesn’t understand.

“If she wouldn’t have got shot, she wouldn’t have died now,” he said. “Definitely, myself, I think [it should be a homicide].

“You can’t be shooting someone and not be responsible for what happens to them. I know it’s after the fact, I mean, maybe someone could get a flesh wound and it later gets gangrene, but you should be responsible for it.”

As for what happened that night, Collins said he doesn’t know, although he said Carr was involved in the drug trade. He found some stolen credit cards in a storage locker of hers that he recently returned to police.

“She was out in a place she shouldn’t have been.”

Carr left behind two children, a daughter and a son. A celebration of life is planned at a park they frequented.

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