On Nov. 3 at 2 a.m. clocks will turn backwards an hour. (Unsplash)

How to prepare for this weekend’s time change and adjust faster

Sleep expert offers ideas to make the transition more smooth

Despite B.C. Premier John Horgan’s push to get rid of the time change, daylight time is around the corner and people will ‘fall back’ an hour on Sunday.

On Nov. 3 at 2 a.m. clocks turn back an hour, giving you an extra hour to sleep in but Alanna McGinn, a sleep consultant, says there are ways to make the transition go smoothly. She works with families — from babies to adults — to teach them better sleeping habits for a more restful night.

READ ALSO: Get ready to ‘fall back’ again on Nov. 3, B.C. residents

She says the best way to prepare you and your children for the time change is by pushing your nightly routine back by 15 to 20 minutes each day prior to the shift, so by the time the clocks change you’re already adjusted to that time.

To get a better sleep on any given night, McGinn recommends working on your ‘personal sleep hygiene’ by having consistent sleep patterns. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day help sync your natural 24-hour body clock while making it easier to fall asleep and wake up.

READ ALSO: Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

Another tip McGinn recommends is turning off all electronic devices before bed time and avoiding bright screens before going to sleep.

Not getting enough sleep regularly can effect your long term health and can lead to increased risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity, says McGinn.

For more information on sleep consulting or for more tips visit goodnightsleepsite.com.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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