Minister Bill Morneau, Haisla Nation Council chief councillor Crystal Smith and LNG Canada CEO Peter Zebedee at the announcement last year of funds for a new Haisla bridge. The bridge update will be necessary for LNG Canada transport, as well as Cedar LNG transport as the projects move forward. (Black Press file photo)

Minister Bill Morneau, Haisla Nation Council chief councillor Crystal Smith and LNG Canada CEO Peter Zebedee at the announcement last year of funds for a new Haisla bridge. The bridge update will be necessary for LNG Canada transport, as well as Cedar LNG transport as the projects move forward. (Black Press file photo)

Haisla Nation approves partnership for Cedar LNG project

The project is aiming to be the first majority Indigenous-owned LNG export facility in Canada

Haisla Nation Council recently voted to approved a partnership agreement for the Cedar LNG project with Pacific Traverse Energy (PTE), a Vancouver based energy infrastructure development company and Delfin Midstream, an LNG export development company specializing in low-cost floating LNG technology.

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The Cedar LNG project will be a floating natural gas liquefaction facility. It is also aiming to be the first majority Indigenous-owned LNG export facility in Canada, the majority stake being owned by Haisla Nation.

“Council has been ensuring that Haisla members are given an opportunity for success, and that our community continues to grow and prosper,” Haisla Chief Councillor Crystal Smith said.

The Cedar LNG Project is being designed to be consistent with Haisla values, with a key priority being minimizing effects to the environment. To help adhere to this, Haisla Nation said the liquefaction process will be electric-driven and use air cooling technology.

The project has also started the environmental assessment process and will be subject to both a provincial environmental assessment and a federal impact assessment.

The project has already been granted a natural gas export licence by the National Energy Board (now the Canadian Energy Regulator), and will have up to 50 LNG carriers a year mooring at the facility and exporting LNG to Asian markets.

“A benefit from our LNG Canada project agreement means that the Haisla Nation can exercise an option for capacity on the Coastal GasLink pipeline, which feeds the LNG Canada project,” Smith added. “Our Economic Development department have worked hard to secure that capacity to maximize benefits for the Haisla territory.”

Construction is expected to require between 350 to 500 workers, with a further 70 to 100 jobs available once operational.

READ MORE: FULL STORY: Feds announce funds to replace Kitimat’s Haisla Bridge

READ MORE: Haisla-owned LNG project seeking export licence from National Energy Board



clare.rayment@northernsentinel.com

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