ICBC encourages people who took their driving test awhile ago to take a refresher course online. Results from the course revealed that over 40 per cent of drivers would fail their driving knowledge test. File photo

40% of B.C. drivers fail ICBC refresher course: results

Crosswalk, school zone and road obstruction signs confuse; texting and driving questions a breeze

ICBC says people’s driving knowledge needs improvement.

Three weeks ago it launched the “Drive Smart Refresher Test,” a 20-question online quiz targeting people who have held their driver’s license for several years or even decades. So far more than 45,000 British Columbians have taken the test, but the results show that if the refresher were the real learner’s licence test – where 80 per cent is a pass – over 40 per cent of people would fail.

The questions people had the most difficulty with included what to do around emergency vehicles, minimum following distances and the meaning of road signs.

Signs that appeared to be particularly confusing for participants related to crosswalks, school zones and road obstructions.

Questions related to texting and driving produced far more correct answers, despite the fact over 34,000 drivers were ticketed for using an electronic device in 2017.

“What’s just as important as knowing the rules of the road is putting them into practice whenever you drive,” said Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s interim vice-president responsible for road safety, in a statement. “No matter how many years of experience you have under your belt, we can all benefit from shedding bad driving habits and refreshing our knowledge.”

The refresher test came out after the number of crashes peaked in B.C. 2017, with 350,000 crashes per year, or 960 crashes per day. Insurance claims totalled $4.8 billion in 2017.

“On one hand we were quite pleased that 45,000 people took the test, but not happy that 40 per cent failed,” said ICBC’s Joanna Linsangan, “But at same time, the average score was 79 per cent, one point away from passing. The key takeaway was that a lot of us have forgotten a thing or two, and we could all use a tune-up when it comes to the rules of the road.”

If you think you could use a refresher yourself, head to icbc.com/drivesmart.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com

Just Posted

Ice Demons returning to CIHL for 2018-2019 season

Central Interior Hockey League will return with five teams after shrinking last season

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Australian firefighters join Telegraph Creek efforts

Regional district extends State of Emergency another week to Aug. 17

UPDATE: 5 injured in plane crash following Abbotsford International Airshow

One in critical condition in incident involving vintage plane

District extends State of Emergency another week

There’s lots of work ahead, but today was a good day: BC Wildfire Service

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Chinese medicine practitioner in B.C. facing historical sex assault charges

71-year old Kit Wong practiced acupuncture from his home during the time of the assaults

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

B.C. woman set for trial in Alberta as animal cruelty investigation continues in home province

Karin Adams was discovered with eight dogs in Alberta weeks after having 16 dogs seized in Quesnel

B.C. company patents Sasquatch, the country’s first homegrown hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, Sasquatch hops are being grown commercially for the first time in B.C.

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Most Read