Anderson is looking to put her 12-day marriage behind her, and focus on her home, her foundation, and her work (Carmelo Redondo photo)

Anderson is looking to put her 12-day marriage behind her, and focus on her home, her foundation, and her work (Carmelo Redondo photo)

Exclusive: Pamela Anderson talks plans for waterfront Ladysmith property after 12-day marriage

Anderson says she can pay her own bills. Peters denies making comments suggesting she can’t

After a whirlwind 12-day marriage, and ensuing public fallout, Pamela Anderson is breaking her silence on her ill-fated union to Hollywood producer, Jon Peters, and rumours involving financial matters.

Anderson and Peters married on Jan. 20, at Shutters Hotel in Santa Monica, California. Anderson had returned from a spiritual cleanse in India where she considered Peters’ proposal. She thought maybe they did belong together, so she texted him to talk about it more, which led them to the ceremony at in Santa Monica.

The two had a very public split on Feb. 1. Weeks later, various publications reported that Peters paid $200,000 in debts for Anderson. Peters told the Chronicle that he never made those comments.

“I haven’t spoken to the press – nobody,” Peters said. “I’ve loved this kid since she was 20 years old. I still love her. We’re friends. We’ll always be friends. I helped her in a way that she needed, but it’s between her and I. I think she’s great, and that’s all I got to say.”

Peters would not say in what way what he helped Anderson.

Anderson said that the allegations of Peters paying off her debts are “ludicrous.”

“I don’t need anyone to pay my bills,” she said. “ I own a $10-million dollar house in Malibu Colony that has been rented for almost two years now and for the next three to five years for $40,000 month. That more than covers all my bills and expenses. I have contracts and other work. I put that money into my Ladysmith project. I believe it’s best to put my money in property. He doesn’t agree. I would politely listen and say I’d think about it. He still looked at me like that naive little girl sitting at the bar. ‘Teeth and a halo’ he tells people.”

RELATED: Pamela Anderson returns home to enjoy ‘peace and solitude’ of Ladysmith

Anderson’s business manager, Michael Ullman of Platinum Financial, confirmed that he and his associate Maribel Ramirez met with Peters and his lawyers. They provided Peters with three years of Anderson’s tax returns, as well as her monthly expenses, and bills that were outstanding at that time. Ullman said that Anderson lives well within her means and is completely financially stable.

Anderson did confirm that Peters wrote her a cheque for $100,000 after their break-up, and said ‘no hard feelings.’

That $100,000 went directly into Anderson’s Ladysmith property. Ullman confirmed that Anderson did receive the $100,000 cheque.

Anderson has been living in Ladysmith since July 1, 2019. Since returning home, she has worked with Mill Bay-based construction company Vertex 8 Ventures to upgrade her property. Anderson said she has invested $1 million in the property so far.

“I’m thrilled to inject some work money into the community. All my savings, all the extra money I make, goes here or to my foundation,” Anderson said.

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Exclusive: Pamela Anderson talks plans for waterfront Ladysmith property after 12-day marriage

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