Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with the Mayor of Edmonton, Don Iveson in West block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Friday November 29, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Edmonton mayor says he can help Trudeau deal with angry western premiers

Don Iveson meets with PM in Ottawa ahead of premiers’s meeting in Toronto

Edmonton’s mayor, who has met three times with the prime minister since election day, is pushing his fellow municipal leaders as potential mediators to smooth over relations between the federal Liberal government and angry western premiers.

Don Iveson said much of the anger on the Prairies is coming from economic uncertainty.

He said the concerns from Albertans, for instance, pointed to a need for what he called “strategic partnerships” to avoid divisiveness that is being “exploited for narrow and short-term political reasons.”

Cities, he said, could help “depolarize” some of that heated rhetoric and push for practical solutions.

Iveson said cities were best suited to play that role because they were the level of government closest to people that “has to deliver practical solutions and can’t get away with blaming others for the real complexities and challenges we’re dealing with.”

Iveson made the comments after a session in Justin Trudeau’s Parliament Hill office, which marked the latest in a series of meetings the prime minister is holding with municipal leaders as the Liberals figure out how to make their infrastructure dreams a reality — and respond to western Canadians who feel left out of the federation.

“The partnerships we’ve had in Edmonton on infrastructure, on fighting homelessness, on housing have been significant, but there’s always more to do,” Trudeau said at the start of the meeting. ”We recognize, obviously, there is real anxiety and real frustration out in Alberta from people who have been having a really tough go of it over these past years.”

That sense of alienation and frustration was amplified by the Oct. 21 federal election, which returned the Liberals to power with a minority government, but stripped them of all their seats in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Iveson said the Liberals could alleviate some of that frustration by moving ahead with the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion — something he said the prime minister personally assured him was going to happen.

The Liberals bought the pipeline in 2018 from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion after the company’s investors got cold feet over ongoing political opposition that delayed work. Delays in getting it built have fuelled anger at Trudeau’s government, including legislation that Albertans blame for economic woes in the energy sector.

“When shovels go in the ground … that will quell some of the anxiety because I think they did mean it all along and it’s actually a shame that there’s still some doubt about that,” said Iveson.

READ MORE: Federal laws at heart of West’s anger up for debate, as Liberals begin outreach

Iveson said Trudeau seemed open to ideas from western mayors when it comes to economic development, which he discussed in the meeting alongside Infrastructure Minister Catherine McKenna and Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, who is tasked with steering relations with provinces.

Premiers are set to meet next week in the Toronto area. Trudeau has been meeting with several of them since the election, including Ontario’s Doug Ford, Manitoba’s Brian Pallister and Saskatchewan’s Scott Moe.

Jordan Press, The Canadian Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

Locals getting good grades when it comes to social distancing: RCMP

The local detachment said the public has been responsible with adhering to COVID-19 practices

Union calling for Save-On-Foods to Extend COVID-19 worker incentive program

Save-On-Foods is ending its two-dollar-an-hour pay increase on May 30

Bish Creek fire removed from Province’s Wildfire Dashboard

Unclear when investigation into fire’s cause will be completed

District looking for public input on cycling plan

Survey is open to the public until May 25

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

DFO allowing at-sea observers again if safe work procedures in place

May 15 fishery notice lays out conditions for allowing at-sea observers onboard amid COVID-19

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read