A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Cost to twin Trans Mountain pipeline now $1.9B higher, Kinder Morgan says

Financial documents now say the company expects a $9.3-billion price tag

Kinder Morgan Canada documents say expanding the Trans Mountain pipeline will cost the federal government another $1.9 billion beyond the company’s original construction estimate and will take another full year to complete.

The figure is included in documents Kinder Morgan Canada filed Tuesday with the United States Security and Exchange Commission related to the company’s plan to sell the pipeline to the Canadian government for $4.5 billion.

READ MORE: B.C., Alberta clash as Kinder Morgan suspends Trans Mountain work

READ MORE: How will Ottawa finish a pipeline Kinder Morgan couldn’t?

READ MORE: Kinder Morgan protest in Delta ends peacefully

Kinder Morgan has long said it would cost $7.4 billion to build a second pipeline parallel to the first in order to triple its capacity, but the financial documents now say the company expects a $9.3-billion price tag.

The documents also suggest construction won’t be done until December 2021 — a full year beyond the last projection of December 2020.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau has been reluctant to discuss how much more it will cost to build the pipeline while the deal is still being finalized, and the closing date for that deal is now being pushed back well into the fall.

The documents also say shareholders will meet Aug. 30 in Calgary to vote on the proposed sale.

The Canadian Press


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