CMSD 82 superintendent of schools Katherine McIntosh. (file photo)

CMSD82 school superintendent takes leave of absence

Janet Meyer, school district’s director of human resources, will serve as acting superintendent

Coast Mountains School District 82’s superintendent of schools, Katherine McIntosh, has taken a leave of absence.

The school district made the announcement on its website on Sunday afternoon and in a press release sent out on Monday afternoon, but offered no details as to the circumstances of the decision.

Black Press Media has reached out to CMSD82 for more information.

Janet Meyer, CMSD82 director of human resources, will assume the role of acting superintendent of schools. The appointment by the board of education takes effect immediately.

The announcement follows a June 5 vote of non-confidence in McIntosh by the Coast Mountain Teachers’ Federation. Members voted 99 per cent in favour of the motion, publicly citing only “a number of concerns” regarding McIntosh’s actions and communications toward teachers and other employees of the school district.

McIntosh and the board of trustees have been under public scrutiny from the federation and the general public over their decision to shuffle school administrators throughout the district for the upcoming school year.

Two reassignments, in particular Skeena Middle School president Phillip Barron and Suwilaawks Community School’s Pam Kawinsky, drew the most public outcry and multiple protests by teachers, parents and students demanding transparency and public consultation.

At last week’s school board meeting, which McIntosh did not attend citing family issues, trustees announced they would institute a one-year transition plan before reassigning the popular principals.

However, the concession didn’t reverse a vote days prior in which members of the teachers federation voted 98 per cent in favour of a declaration of non-confidence in the school district’s board of trustees.


 


quinn@terracestandard.com

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