CMSD superintendent taking year-long position with Ministry of Education

Katherine McIntosh will be advising other school districts on B.C. framework

After a controversial end to the school year, Coast Mountains School District superintendent Katherine McIntosh will be taking a temporary assignment with the Ministry of Education until 2020.

McIntosh will start her new role on Sept. 1 to “support and work provincially on the implementation of the Framework for Enhancing Student Learning,” according to a Board of Education press release on Aug. 2.

“Katherine will focus on supporting school districts to improve student outcomes, while acting as a liaison between the Ministry of Education and the education sector,” writes Shar McCrory, board chair.

READ MORE: CMSD 82 school superintendent takes leave of absence

The provincial framework would create a system-wide focus on student learning, identifying differences in performance among particular groups of students, particularly Indigenous students, children in care and students with special needs. It would also include evidence-based strategies for improvement that are measurable and outcome-focused, according to the ministry’s website.

The Board of Education extended the appointment of Janet Meyer, the school district’s director of human resources, as acting superintendent until Aug. 31, 2020.

“The Board of Education values Katherine’s vision and leadership over the past five years and her innovative approach and successful contributions to public education in Coast Mountains School District,” McCrory writes. “Under her leadership, the district has seen innovative practices of how education is delivered to students and is a testament to the amazing work of all district employees. The marked increase in district graduation rates for all students, in particular for our Indigenous students, is a reflection of Katherine’s dedication to student success.”

READ MORE: Teachers cast vote of no confidence against SD82 superintendent

The announcement follows news of McIntosh’s leave of absence earlier this month, the one-year transition plan of three popular administrators after numerous protests denouncing their reassignments to teaching positions, and a 99 per cent vote of non-confidence by the Coast Mountain Teachers’ Federation in June.

The Ministry of Education will be funding McIntosh’s new position. Despite the non-confidence vote, a Ministry spokesperson says McIntosh was hired because of her “proven track record of improving student success.”

“Secondment arrangements benefit students by providing the Ministry with on-the-ground educational leadership experience that may not otherwise be available to the B.C. Public Service,” wrote a spokesperson in an email to the Terrace Standard. “The secondment has been well received in the education sector, including by the Haisla First Nation.”

The Ministry would not confirm whether McIntosh will be leaving Terrace for the position. The Ministry says secondment appointments are typically one to two years in duration.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Climate, reconciliation and industry top all candidates agenda in Terrace

Debate was the candidate’s last opportunity to address voters in a public forum

Saik’uz and Stellat’en First Nations court battle against RioTinto Alcan to start next week

Saik’uz and Stellat’en First Nations are taking Rio Tinto Alcan to court over their functioning of the Kenney Dam that affects the Nechako River

Climate change, economy and reconciliation take centre stage at Oct. 15 All-Candidates Forum

Six of the eight candidates were in attendance at the Smithers event

Former Terracite Mathew Fee finishes cross-Canada trip on BMX bike

Fee biked more than 7,000 kilometres to raise awareness about addiction treatment

VIDEO: First all-female spacewalk team makes history

NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir did work on International Space Station’s power grid

Zantac, the over-the-counter heartburn drug, pulled in Canada, U.S.

Health Canada also investigates possible carcinogen in some ranitidine drugs

B.C. public safety minister says cannabis edibles not in stores til January

Mike Farnworth says he wants regional issues considered when it comes to licensing

Greta Thunberg calls for climate action in Alberta, but doesn’t talk oilsands

Swedish teen was met with some oil and gas industry supporters who came in a truck convoy

Scheer denies spreading ‘misinformation’ in predicting unannounced Liberal taxes

Conservative leader had claimed that a potential NDP-Liberal coalition could lead to a hike in GST

Council asks to limit cruise ship visits to Victoria harbour

Mayor says motion is not meant to curtail current visits or limit local cruise industry expansion

Chilliwack man pleads guilty in crash that killed pregnant woman

Frank Tessman charged under Motor Vehicle Act for accident that killed Kelowna school teacher

EDITORIAL: Is researched, reasoned journalism the next endangered species?

#Newspapersmatter now more than ever: “In print that privacy is yours to keep”

Kawhi Leonard, former Toronto Raptor, welcomed back to Vancouver at pre-season game

Fans go wild at pre-season game between L.A. Clippers and Dallas Mavericks at Rogers Arena

Most Read