Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

Christine Blasey Ford steps into spotlight to detail assault allegations

Blasey Ford described receiving outpouring of support from people ‘in every state of this country’

Christine Blasey Ford is telling her harrowing story of an alleged sexual assault at the hands of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

An emotional and visibly nervous Blasey Ford, who is speaking publicly for the first time, says she’s “terrified” to be detailing her allegations before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

She describes being at a small gathering of high school students in Maryland in 1982 when she was allegedly forced into an upstairs bedroom by two boys she identified as Kavanaugh and Mark Judge.

READ MORE: Trump says his past accusers influence thinking on Kavanaugh

She says she was convinced Kavanaugh was going to rape her, and feared he might accidentally kill her when he covered her mouth to stifle her screams.

Blasey Ford also described receiving an outpouring of public support from people “in every state of this country” — as well as death threats and online tormenting that have forced her and her family to move out of their house.

When asked whether there was any chance she was mistaken about the identity of her attacker, Blasey Ford said, “Absolutely not.”

The Canadian Press

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