(Black Press Media files)

B.C.’s natural gas supply could see 50% dip through winter due to pipeline blast

It’s been two weeks since the Enbridge pipeline ruptured near Prince George on Oct. 9, sparking a large fireball

FortisBC is warning customers that the recent gas pipeline explosion in Prince George could reduce natural gas supply by as much as 50 per cent as we head into winter.

The utility company is continuing to ask its customers to conserve energy.

“The natural gas system will be challenged in times of high demand throughout the winter,” it said in a news release Monday.

It’s been two weeks since the Enbridge pipeline ruptured on Oct. 9, sparking a large fireball. About 100 residents in the area were forced out of their homes.

READ MORE: FortisBC warns pipeline explosion could lead to dip in natural gas supply

The cause of the fire remains unknown, but police have ruled out criminal activity.

FortisBC vice president Doug Stout told Black Press Media that the utility company has seen a 20 per cent reduction by industrial and residential customers since the rupture.

READ MORE: Pipeline explosion causes evacuations near Prince George

“Demand goes up as the weather gets cooler,” he said. “We’re still asking people to keep their thermostat down. If you can work with 18C and put on a sweater that would be great, and limit use of hot water… cold water washing for your laundry, those types of things.”

Last week, Enbridge said they expect the ruptured 36-inch transmission line to be repaired by mid-November, but both the 36 and the 30-inch lines will only be running at 80 per cent capacity until after the winter season.

FortisBC said it’s working on securing additional natural gas from other companies.

“We are actively working to make more gas available for our customers. For example, we’ve worked with TransCanada to maximize output of the Southern Crossing pipeline that feeds into the Interior from Alberta and are actively working with industrial customers to optimize their energy use – keeping them running while minimizing system impacts,” it said.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Fires still burning near Telegraph Creek

BC Wildfire Service assures residents of a proactive plan heading into wildfire season

Northwest entrepreneurs pitch their plans for cash prizes

ThriveNorth announces 12 finalists in this year’s business challenge

Gas prices spike in northern B.C. ahead of the long weekend

Fuel went up 17 cents overnight in Prince Rupert

Stellar musicians, performers recognized at 54th Pacific Northwest Music Festival

More than 150 awards, scholarships given out to Northwest B.C. participants

Cyclist braking stigma on addiction from coast to coast

Mathew Fee aims at world record for longest distance on BMX bike while sharing his story of recovery

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

Northwest B.C. leaders divided over oil tanker ban

Senate hearings in Prince Rupert and Terrace show Bill C-48 is at a crossroads

Should B.C. lower speed limits on side roads to 30 km/h?

Vancouver city councillor wants to decrease speed limits along neighbourhood side roads

Lawsuit eyed over union-only raise for B.C. community care workers

‘Low-wage redress’ leaves 17,000 employees out, employers say

Landlord of alleged Okanagan shooter recounts deadly day

Tony Friesen was working in one of the units of his Penticton building when he heard shots

Most Read