B.C. pharmacist suspended for giving drugs with human placenta

RCMP had samples of the seized substances tested by Health Canada

The College of Pharmacists of British Columbia has suspended the licence of a pharmacist it says showed a “blatant disregard for public safety” through multiple infractions including preparing drugs containing human placenta in unsterile conditions.

Isidoro Andres “Rudy” Sanchez, the sole registered pharmacist and manager of the Marigold Compounding and Natural Pharmacy in Courtenay, has been ordered to pay $115,000 in costs and will not be eligible to apply for reinstatement of registration for six years.

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The college says if Sanchez’s registration is reinstated, he will not be permitted to apply for a pharmacy licence or act as a pharmacy manager or director for five years after his reinstatement.

The decision, posted on the college’s website Sept. 10, says Sanchez misled the public by making unsupported claims on the Marigold website regarding the effectiveness of human placenta as a drug.

Sanchez didn’t attend the hearing, nor send legal representation, and the decision says he hasn’t provided any evidence to suggest remorse or an explanation for his behaviour.

The pharmacy’s licence to operate was suspended in 2014 after a joint investigation by the college and Health Canada.

“The panel was satisfied that the registrant’s conduct was unprofessional conduct and in some instances also amounted to incompetence,” says the decision.

It says Sanchez manufactured a variety of prescription drugs and over-the-counter health products and an inspection of the pharmacy resulted in the seizure of compounded canabinoid substances in two refrigerators.

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It says the RCMP had samples of the seized substances tested by Health Canada, along with three other suspected prescriptions from Marigold, which patients had returned to local pharmacies, and that they all tested positive for the presence of THC, the main psychoactive part of marijuana.

The Canadian Press

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