B.C. gets another taste of liquor reform

Premier Christy Clark visited a West Kelowna winery Wednesday to give citizens another sip of liquor law reform

Premier Christy Clark

Premier Christy Clark visited a West Kelowna winery Wednesday to give citizens another sip of liquor law reform.

The government supports recommendations in a recent review of liquor policy to make it easier to sample and buy wine, beer and spirits from small B.C. producers, Clark said.

Regulations will be changed to allow manufacturers to offer tastings outside their current tasting rooms at place such as picnic areas. The government also plans to make it easier for ski resorts and golf courses to temporarily extend their liquor licences for patios and barbecue events.

Farm markets will also be able to host sampling and sales of locally produced alcoholic beverages, Clark said. Beverage manufacturers will also be allowed to sell local products not made on-site.

Clark also promised to work with B.C.’s Liquor Distribution Branch to improve access for B.C. products in government liquor stores.

The government hopes to stimulate further growth in B.C.’s craft industry, which currently consists of 269 wineries, 76 breweries and 27 distilleries. A quality assurance program for breweries and distillers similar to the provinces’ Vintners’ Quality Alliance group is also being considered.

NDP critic Shane Simpson said most of the changes announced Wednesday are “common sense” reforms that his party has been urging the government to do. Dribbling out a series of promises as Clark and parliamentary secretary John Yap have been doing may be popular, but it is not the way to develop public policy, he said.

“If the cabinet has decided they’re supporting some of these recommendations, which presumably they have, then put out the report that supports it,” Simpson said.

 

Just Posted

Virus wipes out half the chum fry at hatchery

The number of chum in the river this year won’t be affected

Fundraiser kicks off in honour of missing Terrace man presumed dead

David Kim, 45, went missing April 7 between Terrace and Prince Rupert

DoK wants to have more say in SO2 monitoring

“The EEM is not static and was always designed for periodic review”

Kitimat RCMP ready to test for drivers under the influence of pot

“Like standardized field sobriety tests, drug recognition is observation-based.”

Winter road maintenance standards boosted

Quicker response times to be implemented

VIDEO: Moose found licking salt off B.C. man’s pickup truck

Tab Baker was in his garage in Prince George when the small moose gave his truck a clean

B.C. student makes short-list for autism advocacy award

Brody Butts honoured for his role as a mentor and self-advocate

Austin Powers ‘Mini-Me’, Verne Troyer, dies at 49

Facebook page confirmed his death Saturday afternoon

Alberta man dead after snowmobile collision on B.C. mountain

The incident occurred on Boulder Mountain Friday morning

B.C. parents grieving teen’s overdose death say it started with opioid prescription

Elliot Eurchuk, 16, died at his Oak Bay home Friday, after taking street drugs

16 of 20 fastest improving B.C. schools are public: Fraser Institute

Independent elementary schools remain at top of the chart in think tank’s annual report card

NAFTA: Talks continue through weekend in scramble to get a deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland called negotiations ‘perpetual’

Pulp mill fined $900,000 for leaking effluent into B.C. lake

Mackenzie Pulp Mill pleaded guilty to depositing deleterious substance into water frequented by fish

B.C.’s 2-year lobbying ban starts May 1

Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists can grant exemptions from the prohibition if public interest

Most Read