Skeena Diversity project director Saša Loggin and Vera Ljubomudrova, an English instructor at the non-profit agency, are working to arrange accommodation and other help for members of a Ukrainian family expected soon. (Terrace Standard photo)

Skeena Diversity project director Saša Loggin and Vera Ljubomudrova, an English instructor at the non-profit agency, are working to arrange accommodation and other help for members of a Ukrainian family expected soon. (Terrace Standard photo)

Assistance being sought for expected Ukrainian family

Temporary accommodation needed for family of four

Community members are responding to a call put out by a local social services non-profit agency to provide assistance for the pending arrival of four members of a family from Ukraine.

Now in Germany, the grandmother, mother and two children have extended family members in Terrace but their own house is already full of relatives who arrived earlier following the February invasion of their country by Russia, says Saša Loggin, the project director at Skeena Diversity.

Topping the list is temporary accommodation as the family adapts and becomes accustomed to life in Terrace, she said.

“Volunteer tutors for English. That would also be helpful,” Loggin added.

Loggin said the response so far has been gratifying.

“Within two minutes of our [social media] post going up, the phone started ringing,” she said.

“We all came from somewhere else, but we planned it. This is different. What we are doing is providing a safety net.”

Unlike other recent arrivals to Canada, such as thousands of Syrians fleeing civil war in that country, people from the Ukraine coming to Canada are not classified as refugees, Loggin added.

“They are arriving on temporary visas. How long they will stay isn’t known. Some may wish to stay,” she said. “No one knows what the situation [in the Ukraine] will be.”

When the family might arrive isn’t known, added Vera Ljubomudrova, an English instructor at Skeena Diversity.

“They are now waiting for their documents. Until then, no one is 100 per cent sure,” she said.

The family needs to complete its biometrics requirements such as having photos and fingerprints taken. After that, working age individuals can apply for work visas.

A medical exam is also required but it can only be done by a doctor certified through the federal Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada department, something Skeena Diversity is working to arrange for now.

Loggin said Skeena Diversity has also put its name on the list Air Canada has started for people to donate loyalty points to assist with airfares of Ukrainian people coming to Canada.

“There is a lot to do. It’s step by step. People are really looking to do something to help,” said Ljubomudrova.