Around 60 cats missing: trap set for alleged culprit

Two wolverines were spotted chasing a cat about one week before a trap was set by conservation officers to catch the animals.

I saw a Siamese cat shoot out in front of the road like it had been shot out of a gun, and the wolverine was right behind it.”

Kevin Barry of Coastal Taxi remembered driving by the Alcan apartment buildings on Haisla Boulevard last week around midnight when he saw it happen. Another wolverine quickly followed suit, he said, but he thinks the cat managed to escape up a fence as by the time he turned his car around, the two animals were pacing before a fence.

I’ve worked in the bush my whole life and I’ve only ever seen one wolverine. I’ve seen three in the last 24 hours,” he said, noting he saw a third larger one between two bridges on his way to the Methanex dock.

Conservation officer Gareth Scrivner said it’s rare to see one wolverine in a lifetime. But Barry’s sightings are not the only rarity in Kitimat this summer.

As of last Monday, about 60 cats were reported missing to animal shelter manager Maryann Baumbach, who has been taking reports of missing cats since May after one wolverine was spotted eating a cat in the back yard of a home on Whittlesey St.

It’s getting to the proportion where this is totally stupid,” said mayor Joanne Monaghan.

And although Scrivener said only two cats in Kitimat are confirmed dead due to a wolverine, he said pat of that confirmation process means examining the body.

As it stands, there is no proof the other missing cats were consumed by wolverines, he said.

But Sheila Eynon doesn’t need bodies to suspect wolverines as the culprits.

One of her family cats is missing.

“We’ve never seen anything like this around here before,” she said.

She is afraid that the wolverines will not distinguish cats from small children.

And she said that before last Friday, her concerns went unheard by conservation officers.

But according to Scrivner, capturing the animal has not been a high priority to conservation officers until now because the animals do not pose a threat to humans.

Scrivner said that wolverines have always lived around this area, and there have never been reports of the animal attacking humans.

Never the less, he said that with numerous sightings over a longer time span, the wolverines have become enough of a nuisance to be dealt with.

Scrivner visited Kitimat last Friday and set a trap for the animal.

He said conservation officers are interested in reports of animal sightings from eye witnesses, however, not of missing cats.

He asked witnesses to call 877-952-7277.

Just Posted

Shames Mountain creates new fund for youth in memory of late founder

The ‘Billey Season Youth Pass’ will be given out annually

Coastal GasLink gets interim injunction against Unist’ot’en

The LNG pipeline company can start work Monday with enforcement approved by court.

Terrace users on Facebook post warnings about vehicle break-ins

RCMP say it’s important to always lock your doors

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

Tyler Dozzi breaks national record, ‘running like a madman’

Terrace runner sets new time in Boston in his last U20 race

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Rash of bomb threats a learning opportunity for response capacity, Goodale

Thursday’s wave of bomb threats swept across communities on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border

Mike Duffy can’t sue Senate over suspension without pay, judge rules

Duffy’s lawsuit sought more than $7.8 million from the upper chamber

Most Read