A large crane was needed to help lift and move the 40,000-pound red cedar log to its new location at the Maritime Heritage Gallery. ELENA RARDON PHOTO

800-year-old Vancouver Island log ready for United Nations project

Language Revitalization Pole will be publicly carved, then delivered to the University of Victoria

An 800-year-old, 73,000-pound red cedar tree log sits on Port Alberni’s waterfront, where it will remain for the rest of the summer.

The cedar log, which is more than 60 feet in length, was selected for carving the First Nations Education Foundation’s (FNEF) Language Revitalization Pole in recognition of the UN 2019 Internal Year of Indigenous Languages.

The log, which has been lying in the woods near Bamfield for more than 50 years, was donated to the FNEF by the Huu-ay-aht First Nations. It was transported from the woods near Bamfield to its carving location at the Port Alberni Maritime Heritage Society’s Discovery Centre on Wednesday, March 13.

READ: 800-year-old tree to become UN project totem at UVic

The Language Revitalization Pole will be carved by Nuu-chah-nulth carver Tim Paul over the next seven months. Once finished, it will be transported to its final resting place at the University of Victoria.

Port Alberni residents and tourists alike will have a chance to catch Paul in action at the waterfront throughout the summer. The central location was chosen partly for foot traffic, said Scott Jeary, FNEF volunteer executive director. The log is currently sitting between the Maritime Discovery Centre and Port Alberni Port Authority, and is only a short walk from where cruise ships will be docked this summer.

“It benefits everybody,” Jeary said on Wednesday.

Volunteers will be building a carving shed around the log before work starts at the new location.



elena.rardon@albernivalleynews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Artist Gordon Dick, of Ahtsik Native Art Gallery, helps to lower the 40,000-pound log at the Maritime Heritage Gallery on Wednesday, March 13. ELENA RARDON PHOTO

Just Posted

KUTE expands service to accept paper products

Prior to May 23 the facility had only been accepting cardboard since it reopened on April 22

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

Locals getting good grades when it comes to social distancing: RCMP

The local detachment said the public has been responsible with adhering to COVID-19 practices

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Most Read