(Keili Bartlett)

(Keili Bartlett)

Class will look different at Coast Mountain College this September

The college is embracing a distributed learning model

Coast Mountain College course registration begins on June 1, but courses in the fall will look different than in years past.

The uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 crisis has prompted post-secondary institutions throughout Canada to re-evaluate their course delivery.

“Anything that can be taught online, will be taught online,” said Sarah Zimmerman, executive director of communications at Coast Mountain College (CMTN).

CMTN will be delivering courses through distributed learning, which includes email, web-conferencing, online videos, social media, textbooks and tasks outdoors. Zimmerman said that more than 90 per cent of the faculty have done extra training to adapt to the distributed learning model.

For programs with a practical requirement, like nursing or many trades, instruction will happen on campus with social distancing measures in place.

The college is also looking at staggering the timing of when students are on campus. Some trades classes are already back in Terrace and Smithers.

Zimmerman said those classes are very small – two to three people – but it has been a good way to put COVID-19 protocols in place like handwashing stations and having students enter through certain doors.

“We know its not the same, it’s not going to be the same as learning was last September, but we are all doing our best to make sure everybody is getting the same quality education that they had before, with the same excellent instructors we’ve always had,” said Zimmerman.

Student services like registration will continue to be offered virtually for now, and CMTN is not looking at raising tuition or fees.

READ MORE: Coast Mountain College sets up student emergency fund


@BenBogstie
ben.bogstie@terracestandard.com

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