B.C. actress’s role in Wonder brings perspective to the topic of bullying

B.C. actress’s role in Wonder brings perspective to the topic of bullying

Crystal Lowe plays bully’s mother in the Hollywood movie

Crystal Lowe doesn’t enjoy playing the villain.

But when she landed a roll in the movie Wonder she knew it was a movie she wanted to be a part of, even if she had to play the person that nobody liked.

The Maple Ridge native plays the part of Julian’s mother who is the main bully in the movie.

Wonder is based on the New York Times bestselling novel of the same title and it tells the story of a boy named August Pullman who has facial differences and goes to school for the first time in Grade 5.

The movie stars Julia Roberts, Owen Wilson and Jacob Tremblay.

“The great thing about Wonder is you really get to see (bullying) from everybody’s perspective. And I think that’s what we are lacking you know in the world today,” said Lowe from her home in California.

“I think that’s the beauty of what Wonder brings. It bring perspective and empathy and trying to understand (bullying) from other people’s point of view and why they come from those places and what makes them behave the way they do,” she said.

Lowe moved to Los Angeles only a month ago, even though, she said, the move actually makes it more difficult for her working in the industry than if she stayed put in Vancouver.

“This is where a lot of the big productions get made and because I am venturing into producing and directing, I just have to be here for a little while. Make the rounds here,” said the actress.

Lowe started out as a child actor when she was about 4-years-old but her mother pulled her out of it because she felt it was too competitive between the parents. She told her daughter that as soon as she could drive herself to auditions then she would have her permission to enter the industry again. So, as soon as Lowe turned 16 she told her mom she was going back. She contacted Tyler Labine, another actor from Maple Ridge, and his mother hooked her up with an agent and became her temporary stage mom and manager.

Now the actress has 78 films under her belt and counting.

Currently she is working on another series called Signed, Sealed, Delivered, for the Hallmark Channel.

“It’s with the creator of Touched By An Angel and it’s been going on for four years,” Lowe explained.

“I just want to be a part of things that are uplifting and our show is very uplifting. We need it,” she said.

Lowe believes the world needs more movies like Wonder.

“The world is a strange, crazy place right now and I think we desperately need films like this. While I don’t think all hope is lost for adults, I really really want to invest in the children,” said Lowe.

“They are going to come with an open heart. And, the majority of them, if we can speak to them now before the world kind of gets to be that scary and teach them how to have an open heart, then that can change a whole generation,” Lowe noted.

Lowe likes the fact that the character that she plays is not the most likeable character in the movie.

“You understand Julian a little more when you meet his parents,” she said, adding that Julian’s mom doesn’t necessarily think she is a villain, she is just protecting her own son.

“No mother thinks that they’re a villain. They think that they are protecting their son at all costs and I think that’s the issue we need to address,” said Lowe.

“We only see other people as bad guys or good guys or bullies or not bullies. We have no idea where they are coming from and why,” she continued.

If we want bullying to stop, says Lowe, we have to spend time with our children. And, she added, if we want the dialogue to remain open then movies like Wonder are the ones we must take our children to, and have a discussion afterward.

“I remember being a kid. I hated telling my parents stuff. But if it was in casual conversation because it was in a movie and we were talking about the movie and not necessarily my personal experience, I would have talked to my parents more because I wouldn’t think it would feel like so much pressure,” she said.

Having a conversation about what is right and what is wrong is the beauty of Wonder.

“This movie offers that to parents and kids which is amazing.”

Wonder is currently showing at Cineplex Odeon Meadowtown Cinemas, 19800 Lougheed Hwy, Pitt Meadows, in the Meadowtown Shopping Centre.

Just Posted

Kitimat’s Water Quality Advisory, which has been in place for just over a week, has been lifted. (Black Press file photo)
Water Quality Advisory in Kitimat lifted

The district has been under a Water Quality Advisory since June 2

On June 16 at 6 p.m., the Kitimat Chamber of Commerce will be hosting a public presentation and discussion with Happipad, a social enterprise, to talk about solutions for affordable housing Kitimat. (Happipad photo)
Affordable housing to be focus of Kitimat Chamber of Commerce meeting

Figures indicate the average Kitimat household needs to make more than $92,000 a year

(District of Kitimat logo)
Hirsch Creek Bridge restricted to single lane traffic

The district is restricting the bridge traffic to legal highway loads only

Artist’s illustration of the proposed Kitimat LNG facility at Bish Cove near Kitimat. (Kitimat LNG illustration)
Haisla Nation surprised by Woodside pull out from Kitimat LNG project

Haisla Nation council states its main focus is now on developing the Haisla-led Cedar LNG project

(Northern Health logo)
Pop-up vaccine clinic tomorrow at the Save-on-Foods parking lot in Kitimat

The clinic will be this Friday, June 11 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Most Read