Tennis courts at MEMSS re-open after three year project

Volunteers made it possible to see the tennis courts resurfaced and re-fenced.

Volunteers pressed hard to get the tennis courts re-opened.

Madeleine Robinson headed up the project of the Mount Elizabeth Secondary School PAC to get the tennis courts adjacent to the school field resurfaced and re-fenced.

To get the job done she corralled a number of sponsors and donors together, and on October 1 the ribbon was officially cut, bringing the courts back into service after a three year project.

Several dozen students joined the ribbon cutting event with Robinson, MEMSS principal Janet Meyer, Mayor Joanne Monaghan and councillor Rob Goffinet.

“We started in 2010,” said Robinson. “I saw the potential for students and the community to use the courts. It was condemned at the time and I envisioned it to be used by the community, and to bring life back to the courts.”

The District of Kitimat kicked in $36,500 to the project, and Monaghan was happy to see the project completed saying it is important in many ways.

“Especially for the kids, because they have other recreation facilities now they can utilize whenever they want, and it’s very important as you know for exercise,” she said, saying things like the Internet can lure children away from physical activity.

It’s also a healthy distraction from other common youth activities like constant texting and lack of one-on-one communication.

But volunteerism in the community is another amazing result that came out of the tennis court project.

“I think it’s really important that those types of people are in our community and we’re very, very fortunate to have them and the teachers who were along side,” she said. “We really appreciated it a lot.”

School principal Janet Meyer said having more exercise opportunities is great for student success.

“I share Mayor Monaghan’s thoughts on physical activity as it relates to kids,” she said, noting exercise impacts student achievement as well. “Research will tell you active kids do better in school, so that’s really important to us.”

The courts, until now, were unusable due to their condition.

“The surface was not appropriate for our students to use,” added Meyer, saying now that classes will begin to take advantage of the courts.

Robinson emphasizes the work it took from many different people to get the project to conclusion.

“The reason we had these courts is because everyone came together,” she said. “Otherwise I don’t think we’d have this court today.”

The total project cost $125,000, shared among all donors and sponsors.

“I have the utmost respect and appreciation for volunteers after heading up this project,” Robinson later added in an e-mail. “It’s a lot of hard work pounding the pavement for donations and support along with physical labour while making connections to get other people involved to help.  However, its very rewarding to create positive change in our community and was worth the effort.  With school districts and municipalities working together to pool their resources and funding, the sky is the limit.

She further encouraged the community to not be afraid to get their hands dirty pitching in for other community projects.

“If you’re up for a challenge, just do it!”

Just Posted

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Kitimat commits itself to the global fight against polio

Mayor Phil Germuth signs a proclamation

$2 million landfill capping complete

The purpose is to minimize potential leaching of contaminants from the site.

Pipeline company urges rejection of many seeking intervener status in jurisdictional hearings

Those seeking to participate include District of Kitimat and Haisla Nation

North Coast figure skater to star in Dancing On Ice

Carlotta Edwards learned to skate in Prince Rupert, before becoming a star with millions of viewers

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Canada Post no longer guarantees delivery times amid more rotating strikes

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers closed two major processing centres in Ontario and B.C.

B.C. city councillor resigns as AutismBC director amid SOGI controversy

AutismBC president Gary Robins says Laurie Guerra’s resignation is effective Nov. 12

McGill students vote overwhelmingly to change Redmen team nickname

Student union held a referendum after a campaign by Indigenous students

B.C. university Pride group replaces white supremacy posters

Around 50 people walked through downtown Victoria to share posters of love

B.C. to invest $492 million in affordable homes

72 new projects are part of a 10-year, $1.9-billion strategy

Around the BCHL: Surrey Eagles sliding and Cassidy Bowes flows

Around the BCHL is a look at what’s happening in the league and around the junior A world.

Pit bull cross, chihuahua owners must split costs for dogfight damage, judge rules

Eac side responsible for $577.43 towards injuries in Comox Valley incident

3 random words mark every spot on earth

Innovative mapping system assigns three word combinations to 57 trillion 3 metre squares

Most Read