Kitimat Community Supper Club dishes it out weekly

A group of community minded individuals have formed a Community Supper Club to feed the town.

At its core, Kitimat’s Community Supper Club believes that eating is a right, not a privilege.

And so it began that a plucky group of Kitimatians now serve suppers at the Kitimat Baptist Church once a week on Monday, 5 to 7 p.m..

And the response to their work has been overwhelming, the group says.

The group is headed by President Sherry Brady, with Laurette Combs Howard as vice president, Rob Brady as treasurer, Michelle Popp as secretary and Sandra Hunter as Chair.

“With the recent growth in population and economic changes the need has been more than apparent,” the club said in an e-mail to the Sentinel. “We know of families that have left everything behind in hopes of being hired on here at the Kitimat Modernization Project and have to wait for employment.  We know that the people on a fixed income who struggle to pay their bills each month need us. We aren’t here to just serve the needs we see. We are also reaching out to the hidden needs.”

The group says their aim is to make sure everyone’s basic food needs are met.

But it’s not a charity merely seeking to feed low income and at-risk people, but people of any stature and income.

“We are here to serve the young, old, rich or poor.  We will not turn anyone away at our door.”

The inspiration for the group came from Sherry Brady, who found herself frequently sharing surplus food with people who needed it.

“I was making a surplus of food at home.  I found myself bringing my leftovers to people that I knew needed it. I found myself eventually making more at dinner time because I knew more people, and then more. I needed a way to reach everyone that I knew about and those that I didn’t know about. I’m a mother, I’m a feeder.  I can’t stand the sound of a growling tummy,” she said.

People in the group come from a diverse background, from social work to corrections, to business management and restaurant experience.

But what’s really keeping the group going is not what they bring to the table but what the community at large does.

“We’ve been going at this head on.  We are starting this from the ground up.  We have nothing but the generosity of the community funding us right now.  We hope for the best and prepare for the worst.”

What they really need are just monthly donations, and people to come out and eat on Mondays.

They currently make enough for 100 people each night they’re open.

Until this month the group has been in a trial mode and they’ll be reviewing how it’s been going this month to see what changes they might need to implement.

The support, though, has been remarkable.

“Many people and businesses came to us to see how they could help, or to offer us items, money and food. We are in awe that Food Share was so willing to help us out, and we continue to reach to other organizations. There is a lot to do and we have not been able to make it to everyone, or arrange meetings yet. We really do appreciate everyone’s patience with us because we are starting from scratch.”

The group heavily emphasizes the open aspect of their dinners and said its healthy to have the cross-section of people attend.

“What if someone comes who is a social recluse and this is the only interaction they get? What if an employer is attending and someone comes that recently lost their job? What if an addict is coming and they happen to be inspired by someone who is recovered, single parents, grieving families.  These are all people circumstances that are kept quiet and unseen, which is why we will not turn anyone away.”

 

Just Posted

Repen: FOI data proves Telkwans being ripped off by ICBC

Former Telkwa mayor received a response from ICBC and says the results don’t look good for residents

Fires still burning near Telegraph Creek

BC Wildfire Service assures residents of a proactive plan heading into wildfire season

Northwest entrepreneurs pitch their plans for cash prizes

ThriveNorth announces 12 finalists in this year’s business challenge

Gas prices spike in northern B.C. ahead of the long weekend

Fuel went up 17 cents overnight in Prince Rupert

Stellar musicians, performers recognized at 54th Pacific Northwest Music Festival

More than 150 awards, scholarships given out to Northwest B.C. participants

Dashcam captures close call between minivan, taxi at busy Vancouver intersection

To make the footage more nerve-wracking, a pedestrian can be seen standing at the corner

Deck collapses in Langley during celebration, 35 people injured

Emergency responders rushed to the Langley home

B.C. mom wages battle to get back four kids taken from her in Egypt

Sara Lessing of Mission has help from Abbotsford law firm

VIDEO: Fire guts Peachland home

Crews are still on scene pumping water onto the blaze in the Okanagan neighbourhood

$6K raised in one day’s time for family of woman gunned down in Penticton

GoFundMe launched for family of Darlene Knippelberg, to pay for funeral costs and other expenses

B.C. mountain biker sent home from hospital twice, despite broken vertebrae

Released in Maple Ridge to go home with three fractured vertebrae

Seven tips to travel safely this Easter long weekend

An average of three people are killed, and hundreds more injured, each Easter long weekend in B.C.

Seattle’s 4-20 ‘protestival’ enjoys tolerance, some support – and B.C. could do the same

Seattle’s Hempfest a large-scale occasions with vendors, prominent musical acts and thousands of attendees

Parents say Austrian climber missing in Banff National Park ‘lived his dream’

David Lama, Hansjorg Auer and American climber Jess Roskelley have been missing since Wednesday

Most Read