Grab the binocs and the bird books

It’s time for the 2019 Christmas Bird Count

The 120th Christmas Bird Count season is around the corner, Kitimat!

Between December 14 and 5 January, tens of thousands of bird and winter enthusiasts will rally together to count millions of birds across the continent as part of the 120th year of this long-running wildlife survey.

On Saturday, December 14, participants in Kitimat will take part in this fun winter tradition, many rising before dawn and counting birds until sunset!

Each year, Birds Canada and the National Audubon Society help coordinate and support the efforts of more than 2500 counts throughout the Western Hemisphere.

Christmas Bird Counts are run across Canada and the United States, as well as in Latin America, the Caribbean, and some Pacific Islands. Data collected during the Kitimat, BCKI count include details on the number of birds of each species seen or heard within a local 24-km diameter circle.

Surveying this circle year after year contributes valuable long-term information on how winter birds are faring, both in your locale and across the country.

Novice or experienced, the Christmas Bird Count is for everyone. Whether you like exploring forests, fields, and waters in search of lingering migrants, or prefer counting feeder birds from your window with a warm mug in hand, the Christmas Bird Count offers diverse opportunities for participation.

No matter how you contribute, all Christmas Bird Count observations are used to study the health of winter bird populations over time and guide conservation strategies to help birds and their habitats.

“Every Christmas Bird Count participant is an important part of this valuable project for birds,” says Yousif Attia, Birds Canada’s Christmas Bird Count Coordinator.

“Whether you participate for bird conservation, for some friendly birding competition, or for an excuse to get outside in the winter, your efforts are meaningful for birds.”

The skills and dedication of thousands of volunteer Citizen Scientists harnessed during the Christmas Bird Count achieve incredible results that professional scientists and wildlife biologists could never accomplish alone.

The Christmas Bird Count took root over a century ago when 27 birders in 25 localities from Toronto, Ontario to Pacific Grove, California, led by ornithologist Frank Chapman, proposed a conservation-oriented alternative to the traditional ‘side hunt,’ a Christmas Day competition to hunt the most birds and small mammals.

This alternative initiative to identify, count, and record all the birds found on Christmas Day 1900 has turned into one of North America’s longest-running wildlife monitoring programs.

For more information about the Christmas Bird Count, or to find the location of additional counts, visit Birds Canada’s website at birdscanada.org/volunteer/cbc.

Birds Canada is our country’s leading science-based bird conservation organization. Our mission is to conserve wild birds of Canada through sound science, on-the-ground actions, innovative partnerships, public engagement, and science-based advocacy. Over 40,000 volunteer Citizen Scientists participate in our programs, including the annual Christmas Bird Count.

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