The Nature Conservancy of Canada says giving someone a wolf (or moose, or bear) is a great way to relieve the pressure of gift shopping on yourself and the environment. Photo courtesy the Nature Conservancy.

Give the gift of nature this holiday season

Please don’t be mad, but I bought you a moose

As Canadians prepare for the holiday season, the Nature Conservancy of Canada wants to help relieve the pressure and stress of gift-giving, on ourselves and the environment.

Canada’s leading not-for-profit, private land conservation organization is offering its 24th annual Gifts of Canadian Nature for the holiday season. Through this alternative green gift-giving program, people can symbolically adopt Canadian wildlife or landscapes.

The conservancy has been working to protect lands and water since 1962. With habitat loss continuing to be a major environmental threat to Canada’s natural treasures, funds raised through Gifts of Canadian Nature will help protect important wetlands, forests, coastal areas and grasslands.

In addition to symbolically adopting a piece from a diverse range of Canadian landscapes, people can also show their support for some of Canada’s iconic species. These include moose, polar bear, narwhal, Atlantic puffin, swift fox, wolverine, plains bison and more.

For people wanting to support conservation in BC, gift-givers can choose land in the Rockies, the Interior grasslands or on the west coast. The wildlife “gifts” that are found in BC are grizzly bear, bald eagle, monarch butterfly, snowy owl, Canada lynx, wolverine, wolf and American badger.

“Gifts of Canadian Nature are practical for people who have friends and loved ones who enjoy nature or the outdoors,” said Jessica Panetta, national media relations manager with NCC. “Additionally, these ideas are handy for those on your shopping list who have everything or are difficult to buy for. Here is a way for people to give and receive unique, memorable and impactful gifts. You can avoid mall lineups, buy local and help us care for our natural spaces and wildlife.”

Over the past 24 years, more than $3 million has been raised through this holiday program to help NCC continue its conservation work across the country.

Charitable tax receipts are issued for all gift purchases. Gift recipients will receive a full-colour certificate, a 2019 NCC wall calendar showcasing Canadian landscapes, and a wildlife booklet about the symbolically adopted species. Paperless gift options are also available, in which case the recipients will receive an e-certificate.

More information can be found at giftsofnature.ca or by calling toll-free 1-800-465-8005.

The Nature Conservancy was recently given top marks in the annual MoneySense Charity 100 report card, evaluating Canadian evaluated Canadian charities for their overall efficiency, fundraising efficiency and social transparency. The conservancy was named the top environmental charity in the country with an overall grade of A+.


Steve Kidd
Senior reporter, Penticton Western News
Email me or message me on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Another snowstorm expected for Terrace and Kitimat area

Wind is expected up to 80 km per hour

Don’t do anything hasty!

Kitimat sees a huge jump in property assessment values

Kitimat man gets 18 months for sexual touching and possession of child porn

Bradley Scott Sears appeared before court in Terrace after pleading guilty

Northern B.C. cities break temperature records amid cold snap

Quesnel dipped to -41.9 C, breaking a record from 1916

Pipeline at centre of B.C. conflict is creating jobs for First Nations: chief

All 20 elected band councils along the Coastal GasLink pipeline route have signed benefits agreements

Kids across Canada more at risk of hospitalization from flu this season: doctor

Dr. Theresa Tam said influenza B does not usually peak until February or later

Closed mills, housing surge support a positive forecast for lumber industries

B.C. lumber producers have closed mills accounting for 18% of province’s capacity, RBC report says

Good Samaritan pays part of rent for B.C. woman facing eviction in can-collecting dispute

Zora Hlevnjak, 76, supplements her pension by collecting cans and receiving public donations

Kelowna’s ‘Baby Mary’ finds biological parents after more than 30 years

Geneologist and DNA test helped her connect with her biological parents

Kelowna hotel to award couples for baby-making with Nooner deal

The deal includes a free stay every Valentine’s Day for the next 18 years

‘Scariest boat ride of my life’: Passengers trapped by ice on rocky B.C. ferry sailing

The Nimpkish docked in Bella Coola on Jan.12 coated in a thick layer of ice

B.C. pair ordered to pay $55,000 for oil tank discovered four years after selling home

Judge says defendants breached contract, despite being unaware of tank until basement flooded

Canada to give $25,000 to families of each Canadian who died in Iran plane crash

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also made it clear that Canada still expects Iran to compensate victims

Oil and gas industry applauds top court’s dismissal of B.C.’s Trans Mountain case

The high court’s ruling Thursday removes one of the remaining obstacles for the project

Most Read