Should government pay for rural buses to replace Greyhound?

Most Canadians are open to provincial or federal government putting up the cash, poll finds

A slim majority of Canadians say they support government funding to fill the holes soon to be left by Greyhound Canada, but most hope it doesn’t come to that.

That’s according to a new poll released Friday by Angus Reid Institute, which found 60 per cent of Canadians expressing support for the federal government to step in. A further four per cent said they support the provincial governments taking over.

That leaves 40 per cent of respondents saying the service should be filled by private companies, if there is a sufficient demand.

READ MORE: B.C. bus service applications to be fast-tracked after Greyhound pullout

READ MORE: Market can fill in Greyhound vacuum, B.C. minister says

The support for government intervention comes from both frequent users of the Greyhound bus service, as well as anyone who has ever been on one of the company’s buses, the poll said.

Fifty-four per cent of Canadian adults have ridden a Greyhound bus at one time in their lives. However, 75 per cent said they don’t know anyone greatly affected by the service cuts.

Greyhound announced this month it plans to eliminate all of its bus routes in B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba by Oct. 31.

The move has since prompted a national conversation about the future of rural transportation.

Provincial premiers met earlier this month and agreed that Ottawa needs to act on Greyhound’s withdrawal. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised to investigate.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Ice Demons returning to CIHL for 2018-2019 season

Central Interior Hockey League will return with five teams after shrinking last season

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Australian firefighters join Telegraph Creek efforts

Regional district extends State of Emergency another week to Aug. 17

UPDATE: 5 injured in plane crash following Abbotsford International Airshow

One in critical condition in incident involving vintage plane

District extends State of Emergency another week

There’s lots of work ahead, but today was a good day: BC Wildfire Service

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Chinese medicine practitioner in B.C. facing historical sex assault charges

71-year old Kit Wong practiced acupuncture from his home during the time of the assaults

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

B.C. woman set for trial in Alberta as animal cruelty investigation continues in home province

Karin Adams was discovered with eight dogs in Alberta weeks after having 16 dogs seized in Quesnel

B.C. company patents Sasquatch, the country’s first homegrown hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, Sasquatch hops are being grown commercially for the first time in B.C.

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Most Read