This is the second year London Drugs will accept chocolate bar and candy wrappers, chip bags and zipper lock pouches as part of its Other Flexible Plastic Packaging collection program. (Philip Wolf/Black Press)

Don’t throw out Halloween candy wrappers, take them to London Drugs

London Drugs will recycle candy wrappers as part of Other Flexible Plastic Packaging program

Not sure how to recycle your Halloween candy wrappers? Well look no further than London Drugs.

This is the second year London Drugs will accept chocolate bar and candy wrappers, chip bags and zipper lock pouches as part of its Other Flexible Plastic Packaging collection program.

READ ALSO: How to have an eek-o-friendly Halloween: buy bulk candy and get creative

The initiative, in partnership with Recycle B.C., helps people recycle stand-up and zipper lock pouches, such as those for granola and frozen berries, along with plastic seal, bubble wrap, plastic envelopes and net bags.

READ ALSO: The nutritionists’ case for not setting limits on Halloween candy

The collected material is moved up the pollution prevention hierarchy to be produced into engineered fuel, a replacement for coal industrial settings.

Last year London Drugs diverted over 12,000,000 pounds of material from landfills reaching a waste diversion rate of 93.5 per cent.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

Locals getting good grades when it comes to social distancing: RCMP

The local detachment said the public has been responsible with adhering to COVID-19 practices

Union calling for Save-On-Foods to Extend COVID-19 worker incentive program

Save-On-Foods is ending its two-dollar-an-hour pay increase on May 30

Bish Creek fire removed from Province’s Wildfire Dashboard

Unclear when investigation into fire’s cause will be completed

District looking for public input on cycling plan

Survey is open to the public until May 25

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

DFO allowing at-sea observers again if safe work procedures in place

May 15 fishery notice lays out conditions for allowing at-sea observers onboard amid COVID-19

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read