Trans Mountain pipeline which became operational in 1953. (Trans Mountain)

Canada has enough pipelines to get the moon

Pipelines totalling 840,000 kilometres run across Canada

A recent visit to B.C. by Catherine McKenna, federal minister of environment and climate change, has drawn attention to the Canadian pipeline system.

According to Natural Resources Canada (NRC), pipelines total 840,000 kilometres across Canada. If aligned into a single pipe, it would be long enough for a return trip to the moon, with plenty of pipe to spare.

RELATED: Lack of pipelines costing Canada billions: study

This figure includes 117,000 km of large-diameter transmission lines, with most provinces having significant pipeline infrastructure, according to NRC.

Of this amount, the federal government regulates 73,000 km, which transport energy products worth about $99.7 million at an estimated cost of $7.3 billion.

In 2015, Canada was the fourth largest producer of oil and natural gas liquids in the world, accounting for 4.8 per cent of total global supply. Canada is also the fifth fifth largest producer of natural gas in the world, accounting for 4.6 per cent of global supply.

RELATED: New Trans Mountain pipeline review doomed to fail: Vancouver mayor-elect

The subject of pipelines has caused considerable controversy in British Columbia, after the federal government purchased the Trans-Mountain pipeline following legal and political wranglings between the provincial government and Ottawa.

This extended to British Columbia and Alberta, and with various First Nations finding themselves on either side of the dispute. Supporters say the pipeline is crucial to the long-term economic future of Canada, while environmentalists say the pipeline poses a threat to the natural environment, while tying Canada to what is called a ‘sunset’ industry.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@saanichnews.com

Just Posted

Horizon North construction to start soon

The first gear will start rolling into Kitimat at the beginning of 2019

Haisla yet to sign LNG benefits deals with the province

Other First Nations already receiving cash payments

Area First Nations benefit from LNG Canada project

Agreements with province provide cash, land

Work begins on a new Haisla health centre

It will include a telehealth room, a place for visiting physiotherapists and dentists

Shames Mountain creates new fund for youth in memory of late founder

The ‘Billey Season Youth Pass’ will be given out annually

CFIA announces recall of some types of cauliflower, lettuce due to E. coli fears

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has announced a recall of certain types of cauliflower and lettuce due to possible E. coli contamination.

Top of mind: ‘Justice’ is Merriam-Webster’s word of the year

Merriam-Webster has chosen “justice” as its 2018 word of the year, driven by the churning news cycle and President Trump’s Twitter feed.

‘Spider-Verse’ swings to the top; ‘Mortal Engines’ tanks

“Spider-Verse” has been very well-received among critics, and audiences in exit surveys gave it a rare A+ CinemaScore.

Canadians spent almost $64,000 on goods and services in 2017

Households in B.C. each spent $71,001 with housing costs contributing to higher average

Speaker at rally says Alberta oil ‘puts tofu on the table in Toronto!’

RCMP estimated more than 1,500 people attended the rally in Grande Prairie

White House closer to partial shutdown with wall demand

Without a resolution, parts of the federal government will shut down at midnight on Friday, Dec. 21

Canucks score 3 power-play goals in 4-2 win over Oilers

Vancouver sniper Boeser has 6 goals in last 5 games

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

Trudeau lashes out at Conservatives over migration “misinformation”

Warning against the “dangers of populism,” Trudeau says using immigration as a wedge political issue puts Canada’s future at risk.

Most Read