2019 GMC Sierra

2019 GMC Sierra

Think of it as a Chevrolet Silverado, but with a few extra tricks up its sleeve

When it comes to pickup supremacy, the battle for top ranking rages on. And benefiting from this one-upmanship tussle are the buyers — hundreds of thousands per year — who plunk down their hard-earned dollars and in return get the latest in content and performance innovations.

As with the Chevrolet Silverado, the GMC Sierra has been completely made over from the roof to the road. Outwardly, the body appears similar to the 2018 truck, including a dominating grille that boldly announces to one and all your chosen brand. In fact, though, every body panel has been reshaped and the hood, doors and tailgate are made of aluminum instead of steel. As well, there’s a carbon-fibre box for the high-end Denali model.

All told, GMC says up to 165 kilograms of body weight have been pared from the pickup, even though all Sierras are slightly larger than before and the four-door crew cab’s distance between the front and rear wheels has been stretched nearly eight centimetres for additional legroom.

Underpinning the Sierra is a redesigned steel frame that’s claimed to be stiffer by 10 per cent, resulting in a further 40-kilogram weight reduction. Lighter front and rear suspension components save even more.

Along with a distinctive appearance, the extended- and crew-cab models are blessed with some exclusive items that aren’t offered for the Silverado. This includes an available Multi-Pro tailgate with a load-stop feature that keeps cargo inside the bed when driving with the tailgate lowered. The tailgate can also be partially dropped down to form a small work table or a step-up to the bed itself.

Also available is a 360-degree rear camera monitor (replacing the traditional rear-view mirror) that provides unobstructed views in back, which is especially handy when hooking up a trailer.

For 2019, the Sierra can be had with one of a half-dozen powerplants, starting with a 4.3-litre V-6 that makes 285 horsepower and 305 pound-feet of torque. Optional are two versions of the 5.3-litre V-8, including one with Dynamic Fuel Management (DFM). Its 17 different cylinder-deactivation-mode combinations are constantly working to deliver fuel efficiency in all driving and load conditions. Both V-8s put out 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque.

Also new is a turbocharged 2.7-litre four-cylinder (a first for both the Sierra and Silverado) that’s rated at 310 horsepower and 348 pound-feet. A 3.0-litre inline six-cylinder turbo-diesel arrives later in the year, although as of this writing the output and fuel efficiency aren’t known. Lastly, the 6.2-litre V-8 returns with 420 horsepower and 460 pound-feet.

The V-6 and the base 5.3-litre V-8 are matched with six-speed automatic transmissions, while the 5.3 DFM and the turbo four-cylinder get eight-speed automatics. The 6.2-litre V-8 — and likely the turbo-diesel — is mated to a 10-speed automatic. All engine/transmission combos are available with four-wheel-drive, however the crew-cab-only GMC Denali comes standard with 4WD.

Aside from their unique grilles and trim, the premium Denali comes with a wood-trimmed interior, premium leather-covered seats and a 20-centimetre touchscreen (other Sierras get the 17.5-centimetre version). Also standard is an adaptive-ride-control system that instantly adjusts the suspension stiffness according to surface conditions and driver aggressiveness. At close to $70,000 including destination charges, the Denali lists for much more than a $36,200 base Sierra V-6 long-box extended-cab.

New for 2019, the rough-and-tumble $61,400 4×4 Sierra AT4 gets the 5.3-litre V-8 with DFM (the 6.2 V-8 and the turbo-diesel are optional) plus off-road shocks that provide five more centimetres of ground clearance. Available off-road rubber is mounted to 20-inch wheels (18-inchers are standard).

Although most of the powertrain combinations overlap with the Silverado, there’s enough (and growing) differentiation with the GMC Sierra to make the latter stand apart with its own brand of style, substance and swagger.

What you should know: 2019 GMC Sierra 1500

Type: Four-door, rear- /four-wheel-drive pickup

Engines (h.p.): 4.3-litre OHV V-6 (285); 5.3-litre OHV V-8 (355); 2.7-litre DOHC I-4, turbocharged (310); 6.2-litre OHV V-8 (420); 3.0-litre I-6, turbo-diesel (n.a.)

Transmissions: Six, eight and 10-speed automatics

Market position: General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) go all out building trucks to lure each other’s buyers. The upgrading and improvement is relentless.

Points: New sheetmetal is slightly bolder than before. • Roomier, well-appointed cabs and larger pickup beds won’t go unnoticed. • A choice of six powerplants, three transmissions and numerous trim levels is almost too much to fathom. • Upcoming turbo-diesel option should challenge Ford’s version for top torque, fuel-economy honors.

Active safety: Blind-spot warning with cross-traffic backup alert (opt.); forward-collision alert (opt.); lane-departure alert (opt.); pedestrian alert (opt.)

L/100 km (city/hwy) 14.1/10.2 (5.3 V-8, RWD); Base price (incl. destination): $36,200

BY COMPARISON

Ford F-150 SuperCab

Base price: $34,400

A best-seller for years; new turbo-diesel engine was introduced for 2018.

Ram 1500

Base price: $34,850

New 2019 model has the right stuff. Absent Turbo-diesel V-6 yet to reappear.

Chevrolet Silverado Dbl Cab

Base price: $37,050

If you’re a GM fan, your biggest decision concerns style of pickup you prefer.concerns style of pickup you prefer.

If you’re interested in new or used vehicles, be sure to visit TodaysDrive.com to find your dream car today!

-written by Malcom Gunn, Managing Partner at Wheelbase Media

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Bear in mind that this is the interior of a hard-working pickup truck. The top-end Denali model brings the kind of refinement that’s normally found in a luxury car. PHOTO: GMC

Bear in mind that this is the interior of a hard-working pickup truck. The top-end Denali model brings the kind of refinement that’s normally found in a luxury car. PHOTO: GMC

The Sierra is slightly larger than before and has more distance between the front and rear wheels for more legroom. PHOTO: GMC

The Sierra is slightly larger than before and has more distance between the front and rear wheels for more legroom. PHOTO: GMC

Just Posted

CVSE officer checking out all the trucks before the convoy, which started at Riverlodge Recreational Centre in Kitimat BC and finished at the George Little Park in Terrace BC. (Jacob Lubberts photo)
VIDEO: Kitimat truck drivers rally together in honour of 215 bodies discovered at Kamloops Residential School

The convoy started at Riverlodge Recreational Centre and finished at the George Little Park

Coast Mountains School District No. 82 acting superintendent of schools, Janet Meyer, talks about policies and procedures relating to the death of Diversity Morgan, a LGBTQ+ student. (Black Press file)
School District 82 to revisit policy after transgender student’s death

Diversity’ death has created a deeper resolve for CMSD 82 to continue doing the work they started

FILE – Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, takes part in an event on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous Peoples Day must be a ‘call to action’, says Assembly of First Nations chief

Discovery of children at Kamloops residential school site must lead to change, Perry Bellegarde says

Outside the Kitimat RCMP police station, Diversity Morgan’s family and Kitimat RCMP come together for a pride flag-raising ceremony. (Jacob Lubberts photo)
With heavy hearts, the Kitimat RCMP hosted a pride flag ceremony to highlight the RCMP’s commitment to inclusion and diversification, as well as honouring the passing of 15-year-old transgender student, Diversity Morgan, from Kitimat.
Speeches were given by Staff Sergeant Graham Morgan, Mayor Phil Germuth, Haisla Nation Chief Councillor Crystal Smith, and Diversity’s father, Mike Wilson.
“We are gathered here for the pride flag ceremony, but in my mind, we’re gathered here in solidarity for anyone who’s ever experienced prejudice or discrimination. […] Today we celebrate what makes us all unique individuals,” Mayor Phil Germuth said in his speech at the pride flag ceremony.
Struggling to get the words out, Crystal Smith, Haisla Nation’s chief councillor, emphasized her condolences to Diversity’s family in her speech sharing her similar experiences as well as acknowledging the need for education around these subjects.
Diversity’s father, Mike Wilson, said he wished that everyone was there under different circumstances but was grateful to see the turnout and the support from the community.
In honour of Diversity, the Kitimat RCMP also lowered their Canadian flag to half-mast, to bring awareness for people who are experiencing discrimination and are in need of additional support.
The Kitimat RCMP also stated that they will be lowering their Canadian flag around this time every year as a visual representation of LGBTQ+.
Kitimat Save-On-Foods also donated water and snacks for the ceremony.
Kitimat RCMP host pride flag ceremony in memory of Diversity Morgan

“We’re gathered here in solidarity for anyone who’s ever experienced prejudice or discrimination”

(Haisla First Nation logo)
Haisla Nation host walk for strength and series of virtual sessions for Indigenous History Month

The purpose of the walk is to bring Haisla Nation members together and show their collective support

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
VIDEO: Border quarantine to soon lift for fully vaccinated Canadians

Eligible travellers must still take multiple COVID-19 tests

Chilliwack secondary school’s principal is apologizing after a quote equating graduation with the end of slavery in the U.S. was included in the 2020-2021 yearbook. (Screenshot from submitted SnapChat)
B.C. student’s yearbook quote equates grad to end of slavery; principal cites editing error

Black former student ‘disgusted’ as CSS principal apologizes for what is called an editing error

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)
BC Liberal leadership candidate condemns ‘senseless violence’ of Okanagan church fires

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross says reconciliation isn’t about revenge for past tragedies

A coroner’s inquest will be taking place at the Capitol Theatre in Port Alberni for the next week. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Teen B.C. mom who died following police custody recalled as ‘friend to many’

Police sent Jocelyn George to hospital after intoxication had gone ‘beyond the realm’ of normal detox

FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2020, file photo, Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib leaves the field after an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Atlanta. Nassib on Monday, June 21, 2021, became the first active NFL player to come out as gay. Nassib announced the news on Instagram, saying he was not doing it for the attention but because “I just think that representation and visibility are so important.” (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
Nassib becomes first active NFL player to come out as gay

More than a dozen NFL players have come out as gay after their careers were over

Penticton Indian Band Chief Greg Gabriel speaks to the Sacred Hearts Catholic Church burning down early Monday morning, June 21, 2021. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Penticton band chief condemns suspicious burning of 2 Catholic churches

Both Catholic church fires are deemed suspicious, says RCMP

COVID-19 daily cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day moving average to June 17, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections drop to 90 on Sunday, 45 Monday

Pandemic spread dwindles as 77% of adults receive vaccine

By protesting uninvited in First Nations’ territories, conservationists are acting in a neocolonial or paternalistic manner, says Huu-ay-aht Chief Robert Dennis. Photo by Heather Thomson
A closer look: do Vancouver Island First Nations support the war in the woods?

First Nations/environmentalist old growth alliance uneasy, if it exists at all

Bernadette Jordan addresses the media following a swearing in ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on January 14, 2019. Jordan says the government will provide $2 million to allow First Nations to continue to strengthen the marine safety system across Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
First Nations receive federal funds to purchase marine rescue boats

Quatsino, Heiltsuk, and Kitasoo First Nation’s among eight across Canada to receive funding

Most Read